Dark Dungeons, part 2

Chapter 4: Creating a Character

Creating a character for Dark Dungeons is a relatively straightforward process. You will need a pencil and paper, and some dice.

Creating a Character, Step by Step

Step 1) Name and concept

The first thing to do is to decide what sort of character you want to play. Do you want to be a brave warrior or a stealthy rogue? Do you want to be male or female? Do you want to be dour and sullen or happy-go-lucky? Are you a paragon of virtue or a conniving schemer?

It’s important to decide what sort of character you want to play before picking up any dice, but also important to be flexible in such a concept and to talk to the GM first. If the GM is starting a game with first level characters (which is the usual way to start a game) then deciding you want to play an experienced swashbuckling pirate captain who is an expert fencer isn’t going to work. You would be better deciding you want to play someone who aspires to be a swashbuckling pirate captain but is just starting out on their adventuring career. Similarly, if your GM has decided that the campaign will take place in a world where humans are the only race, it’s no good deciding that you want to play an elf.

Example: Marcie decides that she’d like to play a carefree young tearaway who is bored with travelling on merchant caravans with her parents and wants to set off on a life of adventure instead. She sees the character—who she names Black Leaf—as possibly being magical (maybe an elf) but definitely being someone who is tall and slender, light on their feet, and highly mobile rather than being weighed down with armour.

Step 2) Roll ability scores

Write down each of the six abilities in order (Strength, Intelligence, Wisdom, Dexterity, Constitution, Charisma) on a piece of scratch paper, and roll 3d6 for each one in order, noting down the result. These are your basic scores in each of the abilities.

If none of your rolls are above 9, or if two or more of your rolls are 6 or less, then re-roll all six rolls.

Example: Marcie rolls 3d6 six times in order and gets:

She is pleased with the high dexterity, which fits well with her concept, but realises that with an intelligence of only 8 she’s going to have to abandon thoughts of Black Leaf using magic.

Step 3) Choose a class, and adjust ability scores

Table 4-1: Class Ability Requirements
Class Abilities Can Be Enhanced Experience Bonus Can Be Sacrified Minimum Required
Cleric Wisdom Strength; Intelligence Wisdom 9 Wis 13-15 = +5%; Wis 16+ = +10%
Dwarf Strength Intelligence; Wisdom Constitution 9 Str 13-15 = +5%; Str 16+ = +10%
Elf Strength; Intelligence Wisdom Intelligence 9 Str 13+ or Int 13+ = +5%; Str 13+ and Int 13+ = +10%
Fighter Strength Intelligence; Wisdom Strength 9 Str 13-15 = +5%; Str 16+ = +10%
Halfling Strength; Dexterity Intelligence; Wisdom Dexterity 9; Constitution 9 Str 13+ or Dex 13+ = +5%; Str 13+ and Dex 13+ = +10%
Magic-User Intelligence Strength; Wisdom Intelligence 9 Int 13-15 = +5%; Int 16+ = +10%
Mystic Strength; Dexterity Intelligence; Wisdom Wisdom 13; Dexterity 13 Str 13-15 = +5%; Str 16+ = +10%
Thief Dexterity Strength; Intelligence; Wisdom Dexterity 9 Dex 13-15 = +5%; Dex 16+ = +10%

Once you have your basic ability scores, you will be able to see your character’s basic strengths and weaknesses. Now you must choose which class your character will have. You may have already decided this as part of your character’s concept, or you may have changed your mind after seeing that your basic ability scores are particularly suitable (or unsuitable) for particular classes.

When you choose your class, you are able to adjust your basic ability scores somewhat to fit.

Each class has a particular ability score or scores that can be enhanced, to a maximum value of 18, and a list of ability scores that can be sacrificed to pay for this enhancement.

When choosing that class, you are free to increase the score of the abilities that may be enhanced at the cost of decreasing one or more of the sacrifice abilities a total of two points per point of increase taken.

The sacrificed points may be split between the sacrifice abilities as you see fit, providing that you don’t decrease any of them below a score of 9. If more than one ability can be enhanced, they are enhanced independently of each other, not together.

When choosing a class, please note that some classes have minimum required scores in some abilities. These requirements must be met after any enhancing and sacrificing of ability scores has taken place.

If you had your heart set on playing a specific class, and your ability rolls are such that even adjusting your ability scores by the above method won’t make your character suitable for that class, your Game Master may give you permission to swap one of your other scores for one of the scores that your intended class can enhance before you start the adjustment.

Finally, each class can give the character a bonus (or sometimes a penalty) to earned experience if they have high enough scores in one or more abilities.

This will be explained further in Chapter 11: Gaining Experience.

Example: Marcie has given up on the idea of Black Leaf using magic, and has decided she should be a slippery and lithe character adept at getting out of (and into) trouble. In terms of character classes, either thief, mystic or halfling would fit. She dismisses the idea of being a halfling since she imagines Black Leaf as being tall and willowy; and decides that she just wouldn’t be the disciplined type so mystic is out too. She makes Black Leaf a thief.

Looking at table 4-1, she sees that by choosing thief she can raise her dexterity by sacrificing strength, intelligence or wisdom. She can’t sacrifice intelligence because it is already below 9, so she decides to sacrifice as much strength and wisdom as she can. By lowering her strength by 1 point and her wisdom by 3 points (the maximum she can, since that puts both scores on 9) she has sacrificed a total of 4 points and can therefore raise her dexterity by two points—to 16. She does this, happy in the knowledge that as a thief Black Leaf’s great dexterity score will give her a +10% bonus to earned experience.

Black Leaf now has the following ability scores:

Step 4) Fill in class details

Now that you know what class your character is, you can fill in your character sheet with the abilities that your character gets from that class. Details of these abilities are given in the description of each class.

Cleric

 

Table 4-2a: Cleric abilities by level
Spells per day by spell level Saving Throws
Level Experience Hit Dice Base Attack Bonus Skills Weapon Feats 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 Death Ray / Poison Magic Wands Paralysis / Petrify Breath Weapon Rod / Staff / Spell
1 0 1d6 1 4 2 11 12 14 16 15
2 1500 2d6 1 4 2 1 11 12 14 16 15
3 3000 3d6 1 4 3 2 11 12 14 16 15
4 6000 4d6 2 4 3 2 1 10 11 13 15 14
5 12000 5d6 2 5 3 2 2 10 11 13 15 14
6 25000 6d6 3 5 4 2 2 1 9 10 12 14 13
7 50000 7d6 3 5 4 3 2 2 9 10 12 14 13
8 100000 8d6 4 5 4 3 3 2 1 8 9 11 13 12
9 200000 9d6 4 6 5 3 3 3 2 8 9 11 13 12
10 300000 9d6+1 5 6 5 4 4 3 2 1 7 8 10 12 11
11 400000 9d6+2 5 6 6 4 4 3 3 2 7 8 10 12 11
12 500000 9d6+3 6 6 6 4 4 4 3 2 1 7 8 9 11 10
13 600000 9d6+4 6 7 6 5 5 4 3 2 2 6 7 9 11 10
14 700000 9d6+5 7 7 6 5 5 5 3 3 2 6 7 8 10 9
15 800000 9d6+6 7 7 7 6 5 5 3 3 3 6 7 8 10 9
16 900000 9d6+7 8 7 7 6 5 5 4 4 3 6 7 7 9 8
17 1000000 9d6+8 8 8 7 6 6 5 4 4 3 1 5 7 7 9 8
18 1100000 9d6+9 9 8 7 6 6 5 4 4 3 2 5 7 6 8 7
19 1200000 9d6+10 9 8 7 7 6 5 4 4 4 2 5 7 6 8 7
20 1300000 9d6+11 10 8 7 7 6 5 4 4 4 3 5 6 6 7 6
21 1400000 9d6+12 10 9 7 7 6 5 5 5 4 3 4 6 5 7 6
22 1500000 9d6+13 11 9 7 7 6 5 5 5 4 4 4 5 5 6 5
23 1600000 9d6+14 11 9 8 7 7 6 6 5 4 4 4 5 5 6 5
24 1700000 9d6+15 12 9 8 8 7 6 6 5 5 4 4 5 5 5 5
25 1800000 9d6+16 12 10 8 8 7 6 6 5 5 5 3 4 4 5 4
26 1900000 9d6+17 13 10 8 8 7 7 6 6 5 5 3 4 4 4 4
27 2000000 9d6+18 13 10 8 8 8 7 6 6 6 5 3 4 4 4 4
28 2100000 9d6+19 14 10 8 8 8 7 7 7 6 5 3 4 4 4 4
29 2200000 9d6+20 14 11 8 8 8 7 7 7 6 6 2 3 3 3 3
30 2300000 9d6+21 15 11 9 8 8 8 7 7 7 6 2 3 3 3 3
31 2400000 9d6+22 15 11 9 8 8 8 8 8 7 6 2 3 3 3 3
32 2500000 9d6+23 16 11 9 9 8 8 8 8 7 7 2 3 3 3 3
33 2600000 9d6+24 16 12 9 9 9 8 8 8 8 7 2 2 2 2 2
34 2700000 9d6+25 17 12 9 9 9 9 8 8 8 8 2 2 2 2 2
35 2800000 9d6+26 17 12 9 9 9 9 9 9 8 8 2 2 2 2 2
36 2900000 9d6+27 18 12 10 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 2 2 2 2 2

 

Table 4-2b: Turning Undead by Cleric Level
Level Skeleton Zombie Ghoul Wight Wraith Mummy Spectre Vampire Phantom Haunt Spirit Nightshade Lich Special
1 7 9 11
2 t 7 9 11
3 t t 7 9 11
4 d t t 7 9 11
5 d d t t 7 9 11
6 d d d t t 7 9 11
7 d d d d t t 7 9 11
8 d d d d d t t 7 9 11
9 d d d d d d t t 7 9 11
10 d d d d d d t t 7 9 11
11 D d d d d d d t t 7 9 11
12 D d d d d d d t t 7 9 11
13 D D d d d d d d t t 7 9 11
14 D D d d d d d d t t 7 9 11
15 D D D d d d d d d t t 7 9 11
16 D D D d d d d d d t t 7 9 11
17 D D D D d d d d d d t t 7 9
18 D D D D d d d d d d t t 7 9
19 D D D D d d d d d d t t 7 9
20 D D D D d d d d d d t t 7 9
21 D D D D D d d d d d d t t 7
22 D D D D D d d d d d d t t 7
23 D D D D D d d d d d d t t 7
24 D D D D D d d d d d d t t 7
25 X D D D D D d d d d d d t t
26 X D D D D D d d d d d d t t
27 X D D D D D d d d d d d t t
28 X D D D D D d d d d d d t t
29 X X D D D D D d d d d d t t
30 X X D D D D D d d d d d t t
31 X X D D D D D d d d d d t t
32 X X D D D D D d d d d d t t
33 X X X D D D D D d d d d t t
34 X X X D D D D D d d d d t t
35 X X X D D D D D d d d d t t
36 X X X D D D D D d d d d t t

 

Class Description: Clerics are human characters who have devoted themselves to religious service.

In exchange for taking vows to uphold their religion’s principles and tenets and to never use bladed weapons, clerics gain the ability to drive away or even destroy undead creatures; and to cast clerical spells.

Depending on the particular religion the cleric follows, the cleric may worship one or more gods—or even an entire pantheon of gods. Other religions involve the worship of abstract concepts such as “fire” or “good”, or involve the worship of ancestral or other spirits. Yet other religions are based on abstract philosophies.

Regardless of the type of religion, the powers wielded by a cleric are actually provided by an individual Immortal. It is up to the Game Master to determine the exact details of the religion and what role the Immortal plays in it. Commonly this role will be as an intermediary, servant or messenger of the god(s) that the cleric worships.

With the Game Master’s permission, it is even possible for a cleric to be completely non-religious—having been given clerical power by an Immortal as part of some other more business-like arrangement.

Within an adventuring party, clerics tend to operate in a support role. Their spells emphasise healing and protection rather than flashy attacks.

Equipment Restrictions: Clerics may wear any armour or shield, but may only use blunt weapons.

Cleric Abilities (See Table 4-2a)

Hit Points: Clerics gain 1d6 hit points per level of experience until 9th level. They add their Con bonus to each of these rolls. After 9th level, clerics gain 1 hit point per level and do not add additional Con bonuses (but do retain the bonuses to previous rolls).

Base Attack Bonus: A cleric’s attack bonus is based on their level. See Chapter 10: Combat for details of how this translates into to-hit numbers for different armour classes.

Skills: A cleric starts with 4 skill points plus extra points equal to their Int bonus. These points can be used on the same skill or different skills. Clerics gain more skill points as they rise in level. See Chapter 5: Skills for the list of available skills.

Weapon Feats: Clerics start with two weapon feats, which must be spent immediately on basic proficiency with two different weapons. See Chapter 6: Weapon Feats for a description of how weapon feats work. Clerics gain more weapon feats as they rise in level, but these weapon feats can not be spent immediately upon gaining the level. See Chapter 11: Gaining Experience for further details.

Spells: Starting at 2nd level, clerics can cast clerical spells. See Chapter 7: Spells for detailed descriptions of these spells.

Providing a cleric has had a good night’s sleep (8 hours), they can spend an hour meditating and/or performing religious rites after waking up in order to gain spells for the day as indicated on table 4-2.

Every cleric has access to all cleric spells of levels they can cast, and chooses freely which ones to prepare each day within the limits of the numbers shown on table 4-2.

Each prepared spell can be cast once during the day, and if a cleric wishes to cast a spell more than once then they must prepare the spell more than once, taking up multiple spell slots of the spell’s level.

Some clerical spells are reversible. These spells can be reversed in order to have an effect opposite to the normal effect of the spell. A cleric chooses whether or not to reverse the spell at the time of casting, not at the time of preparation. Clerical spells are always prepared in their normal form.

See Chapter 7: Spells for more information on spells and spell casting.

Turn Undead: Clerics have the ability to channel divine power from their patron in order to drive away or even destroy undead creatures such as zombies or vampires.

When your cleric tries to turn undead, you must first decide which undead you are targeting. If you are facing a mixed group of undead you can only turn one type of undead each round.

Once you have decided which undead you wish to attempt to turn, consult table 4-2b and compare your cleric’s level with the type of undead that you are trying to turn. The entry in the table will indicate the level of success, as follows:

‘-’ —You are not powerful enough to turn this type of undead.

‘11’—Roll 2d6. Your attempt at turning the undead will be successful if you roll an 11 or higher. If the roll fails, you will not be able to try to turn these same undead again during this fight.

If the roll succeeds then roll 2d6 to see how many of the undead are affected. Targeted undead with a total number of hit dice equal to this roll will be turned, with the exception that at least one undead will always be affected even if it has more hit dice than the roll.

‘9’—Roll 2d6. Your attempt at turning the undead will be successful if you roll a 9 or higher. If the roll fails, you will not be able to try to turn these same undead again during this fight.

If the roll succeeds then roll 2d6 to see how many of the undead are affected. Targeted undead with a total number of hit dice equal to this roll will be turned, with the exception that at least one undead will always be affected even if it has more hit dice than the roll.

‘7’—Roll 2d6. Your attempt at turning the undead will be successful if you roll a 7 or higher. If the roll fails, you will not be able to try to turn these same undead again during this fight.

If the roll succeeds then roll 2d6 to see how many of the undead are affected. Targeted undead with a total number of hit dice equal to this roll will be turned, with the exception that at least one undead will always be affected even if it has more hit dice than the roll.

‘t’—Your attempt at turning the undead automatically succeeds. Roll 2d6 to see how many undead are affected.

Targeted undead with a total number of hit dice equal to this roll will be turned, with the exception that at least one will always be affected even if it has more hit dice than the roll.

‘d’—Your attempt at turning the undead is automatically successful, and will destroy the undead rather than simply turning them. Roll 2d6 to see how many of the undead are affected.

Targeted undead with a total number of hit dice equal to this roll will be destroyed, with the exception that at least one undead will always be affected even if it has more hit dice than the roll.

‘D’—Your attempt at turning the undead is automatically successful, and will destroy the undead rather than simply turning them. Roll 3d6 to see how many of the undead are affected.

Targeted undead with a total number of hit dice equal to this roll will be destroyed, with the exception that at least one undead will always be affected even if it has more hit dice than the roll.

‘X’—Your attempt at turning the undead is automatically successful, and will destroy the undead rather than simply turning them. Roll 4d6 to see how many of the undead are affected.

Targeted undead with a total number of hit dice equal to this roll will be destroyed, with the exception that at least one undead will always be affected even if it has more hit dice than the roll.

Undead that have been turned will be compelled to flee from the cleric as fast as they are able for at least five minutes.

If cornered during this time, they will cower and be unable to make any kind of attack, although intelligent undead may use whatever defensive powers they possess in order to protect themselves. The bodies of undead that have been destroyed will crumble to a fine ash, and incorporeal undead will fade away to nothing.

Some particularly powerful undead might have ways of resisting being turned, and a powerful master may be able to protect their minions making them harder to turn.

Example: Elfstar the second level cleric is facing a pack of zombies. On her action she decides to use her turn undead ability rather than attacking with her mace.

Elfstar’s player announces that she is targeting the zombies with her turn attempt, and looks on her character sheet (onto which she has copied the relevant information from table 4-2).

This shows a ‘7’, so she needs to roll 2d6 and get a 7 or higher to successfully turn the zombies. She rolls the dice and gets a 10—success!

Elfstar’s player now rolls 2d6 a second time to see how many zombies Elfstar has just turned. She rolls a 9. Since zombies have two hit dice each, Elfstar has successfully turned four of the zombies (a total of 8 hit dice). She cannot turn a fifth one, since that would be a total of 10 hit dice which is higher than her roll of 9).

Saving Throws: Clerics make saving throws using the target difficulties listed on table 4-2.

Druidic Vows

When a cleric with a neutral alignment reaches 9th level or higher, they may decide to take druidic vows.

Taking druidic vows means that a cleric no longer gains their powers through a specific Immortal, but gains them directly from nature itself. It is up to the Game Master to determine what the attitude of the cleric’s religion (both the mortal church and whatever supernatural entities are involved) is to this change, although that attitude should not come as a surprise to the cleric. More importantly, the player should be informed of this attitude at character creation when picking a religion for their cleric.

Taking druidic vows requires a deep commitment on the part of the cleric, and the cleric must seek out an existing druid and undergo a period of initiation with them lasting from 1-4 months.

Once the initiation is finished, the cleric becomes a druid. Druidic society has no hierarchy or structure and each druid is effectively their own master, doing as they think right.

The druidic philosophy is primarily concerned with protecting nature from corruption and destruction.

As such, druids live apart from civilisation, often in woodland areas but occasionally in mountains or desert regions.

Although there are occasional extremists who seek to kill or drive off all those who intrude on their protected areas, most druids are pragmatic in their protection.

They will not hinder those who travel through or even hunt in their realms—providing such travel or hunting is done responsibly. However, they do oppose the encroachment of farmland and cities into their realm, as well as protecting it from unnatural creatures.

Druids shun all technology, and do not like to use manufactured items. Most will reluctantly use money on occasion, but will generally prefer to barter for what few goods they use and for their services.

In general, druids will keep on friendly terms with people who live around (or even in) their lands; helping and protecting them in exchange for their keeping respectful of nature.

In game terms, becoming a druid has the following effects:

Equipment Restrictions: Druids’ distaste for manufactured and refined goods makes them unable to wear metal items or use metal weapons. They may only use weapons and shields made of wood and/or natural stone, and may only use leather armour.

Spells: Druids continue to cast spells as other clerics do. However, their spell list is slightly different to that of other clerics.

Druids have four extra druid-only spells available to them at each spell level. Note that these are extra spells available to be prepared, not extra spells per day. A druid can only prepare as many spells per day as any other cleric of the same level can—they just have a wider selection of spells to choose from when doing so.

Turn Undead: Clerics who take druidic vows lose the ability to turn undead.

Dwarf

 

Table 4-3: Dwarf abilities by level
Saving Throws
Level Experience Hit Dice Base Attack Bonus Skills Weapon Feats Death Ray / Poison Magic Wands Paralysis / Petrify Breath Weapon Rod / Staff / Spell Special Abilities
1 0 1d8 1 4 4 8 9 10 13 12 Heatvision / Stonelore
2 2200 2d8 1 4 4 8 9 10 13 12
3 4400 3d8 2 4 5 7 8 9 12 11
4 8800 4d8 2 4 5 7 8 9 11 10
5 17000 5d8 3 5 5 6 7 8 10 9
6 35000 6d8 4 5 6 5 6 7 9 8
7 70000 7d8 4 5 6 5 6 7 8 7
8 140000 8d8 5 5 6 4 5 6 7 6
9 270000 9d8 6 6 7 3 4 5 6 5
10 400000 9d8+2 6 6 7 3 4 5 5 4
11 530000 9d8+4 7 6 8 2 3 4 4 3
12 660000 9d8+6 8 6 8 2 3 4 4 3 Multiple Attacks/Smash/Parry
13 800000 9d8+8 8 7 8 2 3 4 3 3
14 950000 9d8+10 9 7 8 2 3 4 3 3
15 1100000 9d8+12 10 7 9 2 2 3 2 2
16 1250000 9d8+14 10 7 9 2 2 3 2 2 Spell Resistance
17 1400000 9d8+16 11 8 9 2 2 3 2 2
18 1550000 9d8+18 12 8 9 2 2 3 2 2
19 1700000 9d8+20 12 8 10 2 2 2 2 2
20 1850000 9d8+22 13 8 10 2 2 2 2 2 Multiple Attacks (3)
21 2000000 9d8+24 14 9 10 2 2 2 2 2
22 2150000 9d8+26 14 9 10 2 2 2 2 2
23 2300000 9d8+28 15 9 11 2 2 2 2 2
24 2450000 9d8+30 16 9 11 2 2 2 2 2
25 2600000 9d8+32 16 10 11 2 2 2 2 2
26 2750000 9d8+34 17 10 11 2 2 2 2 2
27 2900000 9d8+36 18 10 12 2 2 2 2 2
28 3050000 9d8+38 18 10 12 2 2 2 2 2
29 3200000 9d8+40 “+19
+19″ 11 12 2 2 2 2 2
30 3350000 9d8+42 20 11 13 2 2 2 2 2
31 3500000 9d8+44 20 11 13 2 2 2 2 2
32 3650000 9d8+46 21 11 13 2 2 2 2 2
33 3800000 9d8+48 22 12 14 2 2 2 2 2
34 3950000 9d8+50 22 12 14 2 2 2 2 2
35 4100000 9d8+52 23 12 14 2 2 2 2 2
36 4250000 9d8+54 23 12 15 2 2 2 2 2 Multiple Attacks (4)

 

Class Description: Dwarves are a demi-human race. Like most demi-human races, they are less flexible than humans, and all dwarf adventurers are represented by a single class.

Physically, dwarves are slightly shorter than humans but are similar in weight due to their stockier build. Skin and hair colour shows the same range as humans, although both male and female dwarves tend to have slightly more facial and body hair than humans and both sexes usually sport beards.

Traditionally, dwarves live in mountainous areas near humans, where they live underground and use their mining and metal-working skills to make goods and tools that they can trade with the humans for food and textiles.

Dwarves are an inherently non-magical race, and possess no magic users or clerics of their own—not even being able to produce the lesser shamans that goblins and giants—their traditional enemies—are able to field in battle. However, this lack of magical ability makes dwarves much more resilient and able to resist magical attacks.

Dwarven adventurers make tough warriors who are at home in underground environments.

Equipment Restrictions: Dwarves can wear any armour or shield, and can use any small or medium weapon. They cannot use large weapons due to their stature.

Dwarf Abilities (See Table 4-3)

Hit Points: Dwarves gain 1d8 hit points per level of experience until 9th level. They add their Con bonus to each of these rolls. After 9th level, dwarves gain 2 hit points per level and do not add additional Con bonuses (but do retain the bonuses to previous rolls).

Base Attack Bonus: A dwarf’s attack bonus is based on their level. See Chapter 10: Combat for details of how this translates into to-hit numbers for different armour classes.

Skills: A dwarf starts with 4 skill points plus extra points equal to their Int bonus. These points can be used on the same skill or different skills. Dwarves gain more skill points as they rise in level. See Chapter 5: Skills for the list of available skills.

Weapon Feats: Dwarves start with four weapon feats, which must be spent immediately on basic proficiency with four different weapons. See Chapter 6: Weapon Feats for a description of how weapon feats work. Dwarves gain more weapon feats as they rise in level, but these weapon feats can not be spent immediately upon gaining the level. See Chapter 11: Gaining Experience for further details.

Saving Throws: Dwarves make saving throws using the target difficulties listed on table 4-3.

Heatvision: Dwarves have the ability to see not only the colour of things but also their temperature. When a dwarf is in the dark (and only then—normal light overloads a dwarf’s heatvision and prevents it from working) they can use their heatvision to navigate and even to fight. However, heatvision doesn’t allow the dwarf to see pictures and writing unless they are carved into the surface that the dwarf is looking at.

Stonelore: A dwarf’s experience with masonry and stonework—in particular underground stonework—gives them a chance to detect irregularities in construction. If a dwarf examines an area looking for irregularities, the Game Master should secretly roll 1d6 for each feature in the area being searched that is one of the following:

  • Traps involving moving stone walls or blocks of stone

  • Secret doors involving moving stone walls.

  • Newly built stone constructions.

  • Gently sloping stonework.

In each case, if the 1d6 roll is a 1-2, the dwarf is able to detect the feature. If the roll is a 3-6, then the dwarf in unable to detect the feature (and the dwarf’s player should not be told whether this was because the roll failed or because there was no feature to detect).

Multiple Attacks: At 12th level, a dwarf is able to make two attacks per round against any creature that they are able to hit by rolling a 2+ on the attack roll (after modifiers). At 20th level, this rises to three attacks and at 36th level it rises to four attacks. See Chapter 10: Combat for details of multiple attacks.

Smash: At 12th level, a dwarf gains the ability to make smash attacks in melee. At the beginning of the round, the dwarf’s player declares that their character is making a smash attack. The dwarf automatically loses initiative, and takes a –5 penalty to their attack roll for the attack. However, if the attack hits then the dwarf gets to add their strength score to the damage done by the attack as well as their strength bonus. See Chapter 10: Combat for details of smash attacks.

Parry: At 12th level, a dwarf can choose to use the parry action. The dwarf’s player declares that their character is parrying at the beginning of the round before initiative is rolled. The dwarf makes no attacks during the round (and therefore needs no initiative score), but all incoming attacks are made at a –4 penalty.

Spell Resistance: At 16th level and higher, a dwarf only takes half damage from all spells and spell-like abilities. If the attack normally allows a saving throw for half damage then the dwarf only takes a quarter of normal damage if they save successfully.

Elf

 

Table 4-4: Elf abilities by level
Spells per day by spell level Saving Throws
Level Experience Hit Dice Base Attack Bonus Skills Weapon Feats 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 Death Ray / Poison Magic Wands Paralysis / Petrify Breath Weapon Rod / Staff / Spell Special Abilities
1 0 1d6 1 4 2 1 12 13 13 15 15 Heatvision / Elfsight / Ghoul Immunity
2 4000 2d6 1 4 2 2 12 13 13 15 15
3 8000 3d6 1 4 3 2 1 11 12 12 14 14
4 16000 4d6 2 4 3 2 2 9 11 11 12 12
5 32000 5d6 2 5 3 2 2 1 8 10 10 11 11
6 64000 6d6 3 5 4 3 2 2 7 9 9 10 10
7 120000 7d6 3 5 4 3 2 2 1 5 8 8 8 8
8 250000 8d6 4 5 4 3 3 2 2 4 7 7 7 7
9 400000 9d6 4 6 5 3 3 2 2 1 3 6 6 6 6
10 550000 9d6+1 5 6 5 4 3 3 2 2 3 5 5 4 4
11 700000 9d6+2 5 6 6 4 4 4 3 2 2 4 4 3 3 Multiple Attacks (2) / Smash / Parry
12 850000 9d6+3 6 6 6 4 4 4 3 2 1 2 4 4 3 3
13 1000000 9d6+4 6 7 6 5 4 4 3 2 2 2 4 4 2 2
14 1150000 9d6+5 7 7 6 5 4 4 4 3 2 2 3 3 2 2 Breath Evasion
15 1300000 9d6+6 7 7 7 5 4 4 4 3 2 1 2 3 3 2 2
16 1450000 9d6+7 8 7 7 5 5 5 4 3 2 2 2 3 3 2 2
17 1600000 9d6+8 8 8 7 6 5 5 4 4 3 2 2 2 2 2 2
18 1750000 9d6+9 9 8 7 6 5 5 4 4 3 2 1 2 2 2 2 2 Multiple Attacks (3)
19 1900000 9d6+10 9 8 7 6 5 5 5 4 3 2 2 2 2 2 2 2
20 2050000 9d6+11 10 8 7 6 5 5 5 4 4 3 2 2 2 2 2 2
21 2200000 9d6+12 10 9 7 6 5 5 5 4 4 3 2 1 2 2 2 2 2
22 2350000 9d6+13 11 9 7 6 6 5 5 5 4 3 2 2 2 2 2 2 2
23 2500000 9d6+14 11 9 8 6 6 6 6 5 4 3 3 2 2 2 2 2 2
24 2650000 9d6+15 12 9 8 7 7 6 6 5 5 4 3 2 2 2 2 2 2
25 2800000 9d6+16 12 10 8 7 7 6 6 5 5 4 4 3 2 2 2 2 2
26 2950000 9d6+17 13 10 8 7 7 7 6 6 5 5 4 3 2 2 2 2 2
27 3100000 9d6+18 13 10 8 7 7 7 6 6 5 5 5 4 2 2 2 2 2
28 3250000 9d6+19 14 10 8 8 8 7 6 6 6 6 5 4 2 2 2 2 2
29 3400000 9d6+20 14 11 8 8 8 7 7 7 6 6 5 5 2 2 2 2 2
30 3550000 9d6+21 15 11 9 8 8 8 7 7 7 6 6 5 2 2 2 2 2
31 3700000 9d6+22 15 11 9 8 8 8 7 7 7 7 6 6 2 2 2 2 2
32 3850000 9d6+23 16 11 9 9 8 8 8 8 7 7 7 6 2 2 2 2 2
33 4000000 9d6+24 16 12 9 9 9 9 8 8 8 7 7 7 2 2 2 2 2
34 4150000 9d6+25 17 12 9 9 9 9 9 8 8 8 8 7 2 2 2 2 2
35 4300000 9d6+26 17 12 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 8 8 8 2 2 2 2 2
36 4450000 9d6+27 18 12 10 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 2 2 2 2 2

Class Description: Elves are a demi-human race. Like most demi-human races, they are less flexible than humans, and all elf adventurers are represented by a single class.

Elves are more slender and graceful than humans, but they are approximately the same height. Although elves show a similar range of skin colours to those of humans in terms of shade, the hue of their skin tends to be more yellow-brown than that of humans giving them a colouration resembling that of wood anywhere from light pine through to dark ebony. The ears of elves are pointed.

Elves have no body or facial hair, although the hair on their heads is luxuriant, and changes colour throughout their life like the colours of leaves change through seasons—starting a light green and slowly darkening, as the elf matures before changing to brown, gold and red in old age.

Elves are naturally magical creatures, and all elves are capable of casting low level magical spells.

Elven adventurers are usually much more highly skilled and have spell casting abilities rivalling the finest human magic users. However, despite their inherent magic elves are unable to become clerics or shamans.

Elves usually live in woodland or forest, and have an affinity for trees. Their towns tend to be in the treetops, woven out of living branches. Elven communities usually have a deep respect for nature, and work together with human druids.

Elves are fine crafters of wood, and although they rarely mine for it themselves they are capable of delicate metalwork as well. Their natural magical ability makes them excellent producers of magic items known for their physical beauty as well as their power.

In an adventuring situation, elves can both fight competently (although not quite as well as a human fighter) and use magic making them very flexible. Elven characters pay for this, however, by advancing in level the most slowly of any class.

Equipment Restrictions: Elves can wear any armour or shield, and can use any weapon.

Elf Abilities (See Table 4-4)

Hit Points: Elves gain 1d6 hit points per level of experience until 9th level. They add their Con bonus to each of these rolls. After 9th level, elves gain 1 hit point per level and do not add additional Con bonuses (but do retain the bonuses to previous rolls).

Base Attack Bonus: An elf’s attack bonus is based on their level. See Chapter 10: Combat for details of how this translates into to-hit numbers for different armour classes.

Skills: An elf starts with 4 skill points plus extra points equal to their Int bonus. These points can be used on the same skill or different skills. Elves gain more skill points as they rise in level. See Chapter 5: Skills for the list of available skills.

Weapon Feats: Elves start with two weapon feats, which must be spent immediately on basic proficiency with two different weapons. See Chapter 6: Weapon Feats for a description of how weapon feats work. Elves gain more weapon feats as they rise in level, but these weapon feats can not be spent immediately upon gaining the level. See Chapter 11: Gaining Experience for further details.

Spells: Elves can cast magic-user spells. See Chapter 7: Spells for detailed descriptions of these spells.

Providing an elf has had a good night’s sleep (8 hours), they can spend an hour studying their spell book after waking up in order to gain spells for the day as indicated on table 4-4.

A 1st level elf starts with only two spells in their spell book, and must acquire more during their adventures. Elves may prepare any spell from their book in either the normal or the reversed form (if the spell has a reversed form), but may not prepare spells from someone else’s book or from a scroll; not even by using a Read Magic spell.

Each prepared spell can be cast once during the day, and if an elf wishes to cast a spell more than once then they must prepare the spell more than once, taking up multiple spell slots of the spell’s level. Some magic user spells are reversible. These spells can be reversed in order to have an effect opposite to the normal effect of the spell. An elf chooses whether or not to reverse the spell at the time of preparation, not at the time of casting.

A beginning elf starts with a spell book given to them by their master, and this spell book will contain the spell Read Magic and one other 1st level spell of the player’s choice. This spell book is a gift from the character’s master and does not need to be paid for.

See Chapter 7: Spells for more information on spells and spell casting.

Saving Throws: Elves make saving throws using the target difficulties listed on table 4-4.

Heatvision: Elves have the ability to see not only the colour of things but also their temperature. When an elf is in the dark (and only then—normal light overloads an elf’s heatvision and prevents it from working) they can use their heatvision to navigate and even to fight. However, heatvision doesn’t allow the elf to see pictures and writing unless they are carved into the surface that the elf is looking at.

Elfsight: The superior eyesight of elves enables them to find secret and hidden doors more easily than other characters. See Chapter 9: Dungeon Delving for more details on secret doors.

Ghoul Immunity: Elves are immune to the paralysis caused by the touch of ghouls and ghasts. They are not immune to other forms of paralysis.

Multiple Attacks: At 11th level, an elf is able to make two attacks per round against any creature that they are able to hit by rolling a 2+ on the attack roll (after modifiers). At 18th level, this rises to three attacks. See Chapter 10: Combat for details of multiple attacks.

Smash: At 11th level, an elf gains the ability to make smash attacks in melee. At the beginning of the round, the elf’s player declares that their character is making a smash attack. The elf automatically loses initiative, and takes a –5 penalty to their attack roll for the attack. However, if the attack hits then the elf gets to add their strength score to the damage done by the attack as well as their strength bonus. See Chapter 10: Combat for details of smash attacks.

Parry: At 11th level, an elf can choose to use the parry action. The elf’s player declares that their character is parrying at the beginning of the round before initiative is rolled. The elf makes no attacks during the round (and therefore needs no initiative score), but all incoming attacks are made at a –4 penalty.

Breath Evasion: At 14th level and higher, an elf only takes half damage from all breath weapons such as those used by dragons. If the attack normally allows a saving throw for half damage then the elf only takes a quarter of normal damage if they save successfully.

Fighter

Table 4-5: Fighter abilities by level
Saving Throws
Level Experience Hit Dice Base Attack Bonus Skills Weapon Feats Death Ray / Poison Magic Wands Paralysis / Petrify Breath Weapon Rod / Staff / Spell Special Abilities
1 0 1d8 1 4 4 12 13 14 15 16
2 2000 2d8 1 4 4 12 13 14 15 16
3 4000 3d8 2 4 5 11 12 13 14 15
4 8000 4d8 2 4 5 11 12 13 14 15
5 16000 5d8 3 5 5 10 11 12 13 14
6 32000 6d8 4 5 6 9 10 11 12 13
7 64000 7d8 4 5 6 9 10 11 12 13
8 120000 8d8 5 5 6 8 9 10 11 12
9 240000 9d8 6 6 7 7 8 9 10 11 Smash / Parry
10 360000 9d8+2 6 6 7 7 8 9 10 11
11 480000 9d8+4 7 6 8 6 7 8 9 10
12 600000 9d8+6 8 6 8 6 7 8 9 10 Multiple Attacks (2)
13 720000 9d8+8 8 7 8 6 6 7 8 9
14 840000 9d8+10 9 7 8 6 6 7 8 9
15 960000 9d8+12 10 7 9 6 6 7 8 9
16 1080000 9d8+14 10 7 9 5 6 6 7 8
17 1200000 9d8+16 11 8 9 5 6 6 7 8
18 1320000 9d8+18 12 8 9 5 6 6 7 8
19 1440000 9d8+20 12 8 10 5 5 6 6 7
20 1560000 9d8+22 13 8 10 5 5 6 6 7
21 1680000 9d8+24 14 9 10 5 5 6 6 7
22 1800000 9d8+26 14 9 10 4 5 5 5 6
23 1920000 9d8+28 15 9 11 4 5 5 5 6
24 2040000 9d8+30 16 9 11 4 5 5 5 6 Multiple Attacks (3)
25 2160000 9d8+32 16 10 11 4 4 5 4 5
26 2280000 9d8+34 17 10 11 4 4 5 4 5
27 2400000 9d8+36 18 10 12 4 4 5 4 5
28 2520000 9d8+38 18 10 12 3 4 4 3 4
29 2640000 9d8+40 “+19
+19″ 11 12 3 4 4 3 4
30 2760000 9d8+42 20 11 13 3 4 4 3 4
31 2880000 9d8+44 20 11 13 3 3 3 2 3
32 3000000 9d8+46 21 11 13 3 3 3 2 3
33 3120000 9d8+48 22 12 14 3 3 3 2 3
34 3240000 9d8+50 22 12 14 2 2 2 2 2
35 3360000 9d8+52 23 12 14 2 2 2 2 2
36 3480000 9d8+54 23 12 15 2 2 2 2 2 Multiple Attacks (4)

 

Class Description: Fighters are human characters who have been trained in the art of combat. They range from noble chevaliers and daring swashbucklers to brutal thugs and grizzled mercenaries.

In an adventuring party, fighters form the main front line, holding off the enemy and protecting the more vulnerable party members.

Equipment Restrictions: Fighters can wear any armour or shield, and can use any weapon.

Fighter Abilities (See Table 4-5)

Hit Points: Fighters gain 1d8 hit points per level of experience until 9th level. They add their Con bonus to each of these rolls. After 9th level, fighters gain 2 hit points per level and do not add additional Con bonuses (but do retain the bonuses to previous rolls).

Base Attack Bonus: A fighter’s attack bonus is based on their level. See Chapter 10: Combat for details of how this translates into to-hit numbers for different armour classes.

Skills: A fighter starts with 4 skill points plus extra points equal to their Int bonus. These points can be used on the same skill or different skills. Fighters gain more skill points as they rise in level. See Chapter 5: Skills for the list of available skills.

Weapon Feats: Fighters start with four weapon feats, which must be spent immediately on basic proficiency with four different weapons. See Chapter 6: Weapon Feats for a description of how weapon feats work. Fighters gain more weapon feats as they rise in level, but these weapon feats can not be spent immediately upon gaining the level. See Chapter 11: Gaining Experience for further details.

Saving Throws: Fighters make saving throws using the target difficulties listed on table 4-5.

Smash: At 9th level, a fighter gains the ability to make smash attacks in melee. At the beginning of the round, the fighter’s player declares that their character is making a smash attack. The fighter automatically loses initiative, and takes a –5 penalty to their attack roll for the attack. However, if the attack hits then the fighter gets to add their strength score to the damage done by the attack as well as their strength bonus. See Chapter 10: Combat for details of smash attacks.

Parry: At 9th level, a fighter can choose to use the parry action. The fighter’s player declares that their character is parrying at the beginning of the round before initiative is rolled. The fighter makes no attacks during the round (and therefore needs no initiative score), but all incoming attacks are made at a –4 penalty.

Multiple Attacks: At 12th level, a fighter is able to make two attacks per round against any creature that they are able to hit by rolling a 2+ on the attack roll (after modifiers). At 24th level, this rises to three attacks and at 36th level it rises to four attacks. See Chapter 10: Combat for details of multiple attacks.

Chivalric Vows

After reaching 9th level, a fighter who has received a title of nobility (knight or higher) might decide to take chivalric vows and dedicate themselves to a cause such as a church or a noble. Taking chivalric vows puts restrictions on the fighter’s behaviour but gives them extra abilities in exchange.

A fighter wishing to take chivalric vows must first find a suitable chivalric order with which they share an alignment, and then spend a month living with the order. At the end of this time, the fighter undertakes a night long vigil, and then becomes a chevalier. Once the fighter has qualified in this way, the order places them with a particular church or noble who is a supporter of the order. The fighter may or may not get a choice of liege, but betraying a liege is considered betrayal of the order and doing so strips the chevalier of all chivalric abilities and is also likely to incur the wrath of the order.

All chevaliers must obey a strict code-of-conduct, the exact details of which will vary from order to order but will usually involve a requirement to provide hospitality and/or sanctuary to fellow chevaliers of the same order.

Lawful chevaliers are often called paladins, and chaotic chevaliers are often called avengers, but this makes no difference to the game mechanics.

As a member of a chivalric order, the fighter gains the following benefits:

Detect Evil: The chevalier can cast a Detect Evil spell (as per the cleric spell of the same name) as often as they like. Casting this spell does take the fighter’s action for a round, so cannot be done at the same time as attacking.

Spells: Chevaliers with a wisdom score of at least 9 can cast cleric spells as if a cleric of one third the chevalier’s level. For example a 17th level chevalier can cast spells as if a 6th level cleric. All the normal rules and restrictions that apply to a cleric’s casting and preparation of spells also apply to the chevalier.

Turn Undead: Chevaliers can turn undead as if a cleric of one third the chevalier’s level. For example a 17th level chevalier can turn undead as if a 6th level cleric. All the normal rules and restrictions that apply to a cleric’s turning undead also apply to the chevalier.

Halfling

 

Table 4-6: Halfling abilities by level
Saving Throws
Level Experience Hit Dice Base Attack Bonus Skills Weapon Feats Death Ray / Poison Magic Wands Paralysis / Petrify Breath Weapon Rod / Staff / Spell Special Abilities
1 0 1d6 1 4 2 8 9 10 13 12 Small/Nimble/Unobtrusive
2 2000 2d6 1 4 2 8 9 10 13 12
3 4000 3d6 1 4 3 7 8 9 12 11
4 8000 4d6 2 4 3 6 7 8 10 9
5 16000 5d6 2 5 3 5 6 7 9 8
6 32000 6d6 3 5 4 4 5 6 8 7
7 64000 7d6 3 5 4 3 4 5 6 5
8 120000 8d6 4 5 4 2 3 4 5 4
9 240000 9d6 4 6 5 2 3 4 5 4 Spell Resistance
10 360000 9d6+1 5 6 5 2 2 3 4 3
11 480000 9d6+2 5 6 6 2 2 3 4 3 Multiple Attacks/Smash/Parry
12 600000 9d6+3 6 6 6 2 2 2 3 2
13 720000 9d6+4 6 7 6 2 2 2 3 2
14 840000 9d6+5 7 7 6 2 2 2 2 2
15 960000 9d6+6 7 7 7 2 2 2 2 2 Breath Evasion
16 1080000 9d6+7 8 7 7 2 2 2 2 2
17 1200000 9d6+8 8 8 7 2 2 2 2 2
18 1320000 9d6+9 9 8 7 2 2 2 2 2 Multiple Attacks (3)
19 1440000 9d6+10 9 8 7 2 2 2 2 2
20 1560000 9d6+11 10 8 7 2 2 2 2 2
21 1680000 9d6+12 10 9 7 2 2 2 2 2
22 1800000 9d6+13 11 9 7 2 2 2 2 2
23 1920000 9d6+14 11 9 8 2 2 2 2 2
24 2040000 9d6+15 12 9 8 2 2 2 2 2
25 2160000 9d6+16 12 10 8 2 2 2 2 2
26 2280000 9d6+17 13 10 8 2 2 2 2 2
27 2400000 9d6+18 13 10 8 2 2 2 2 2
28 2520000 9d6+19 14 10 8 2 2 2 2 2
29 2640000 9d6+20 14 11 8 2 2 2 2 2
30 2760000 9d6+21 15 11 9 2 2 2 2 2
31 2880000 9d6+22 15 11 9 2 2 2 2 2
32 3000000 9d6+23 16 11 9 2 2 2 2 2
33 3120000 9d6+24 16 12 9 2 2 2 2 2
34 3240000 9d6+25 17 12 9 2 2 2 2 2
35 3360000 9d6+26 17 12 9 2 2 2 2 2
36 3480000 9d6+27 18 12 10 2 2 2 2 2

Class Description: Halflings are a demi-human race. Like most demi-human races, they are less flexible than humans, and all halfling adventurers are represented by a single class.

Halflings are much shorter and lighter than humans, standing only 3’ tall. They are of a proportionally similar build to humans, with the exception of their feet—which are large and covered in hair. The soles of halflings’ feet are tough and resilient, and halflings often travel bare-footed.

Halflings’ skin tone has a similar range to that of humans, as does their hair colour. Halflings do not grow beards or moustaches, but the sideburns of adult males tend to be longer than those of humans.

Like dwarves, halflings are an inherently non-magical race, and possess no magic users or clerics of their own. They share the dwarves’ natural resilience and resistance to magical attacks, and although they are not as physically tough and adept at fighting as dwarves they make up for this with their natural stealth.

Halflings are very gregarious and can be commonly found living amongst humans and other demi-humans. If left to themselves, they form small villages in grasslands and hills where they excel at farming.

Halfling food production and the halfling love of cookery and brewing make them very popular amongst the other races.

Halfling adventurers make reasonably skilled warriors and scouts who are excel in outdoor environments.

Equipment Restrictions: Halflings can wear any armour or shield, and can use any small weapon. They cannot use medium or large weapons due to their small stature.

Halfling Abilities (See Table 4-7)

Hit Points: Halflings gain 1d6 hit points per level of experience until 9th level.

They add their Con bonus to each of these rolls. After 9th level, halflings gain 1 hit point per level and do not add additional Con bonuses (but do retain the bonuses to previous rolls).

Base Attack Bonus: A halfling’s attack bonus is based on their level. See Chapter 10: Combat for details of how this translates into to-hit numbers for different armour classes.

Skills: A halfling starts with 4 skill points plus extra points equal to their Int bonus. These points can be used on the same skill or different skills. Halflings gain more skill points as they rise in level. See Chapter 5: Skills for the list of available skills.

Weapon Feats: Halflings start with two weapon feats, which must be spent immediately on basic proficiency with two different weapons. See Chapter 6: Weapon Feats for a description of how weapon feats work. Halflings gain more weapon feats as they rise in level, but these weapon feats can not be spent immediately upon gaining the level. See Chapter 11: Gaining Experience for further details.

Saving Throws: Halflings make saving throws using the target difficulties listed on table 4-6.

Small: Halflings’ small size makes it hard for larger creatures to hit them. Halflings gain a –2 bonus to armour class against attacks from creatures of larger than human size.

Nimble: A halfling’s natural agility gives it a +1 bonus to attack rolls when using any missile weapon and a +1 bonus to initiative rolls.

Unobtrusive: In outdoor surroundings, a halfling who remains still can hide with a 90% chance of success providing there are bushes, rocks or trees that can be used as cover. Indoors, a halfling who remains still can hide with a 33% chance of success as long as there is cover or shadow available.

Halflings use this ability to hide in natural daylight, but magical light such as that from a Continual Light spell prevents this ability from working.

Spell Resistance: At 9th level and higher, a halfling only takes half damage from all spells and spell-like abilities. If the attack normally allows a saving throw for half damage then the halfling only takes a quarter of normal damage if they save successfully.

Multiple Attacks: At 11th level, a halfling is able to make two attacks per round against any creature that they are able to hit by rolling a 2+ on the attack roll (after modifiers).

At 18th level, this rises to three attacks. See Chapter 10: Combat for details of multiple attacks.

Smash: At 11th level, a halfling gains the ability to make smash attacks in melee. At the beginning of the round, the halfling’s player declares that their character is making a smash attack. The halfling automatically loses initiative, and takes a –5 penalty to their attack roll for the attack. However, if the attack hits then the halfling gets to add their strength score to the damage done by the attack as well as their strength bonus. See Chapter 10: Combat for details of smash attacks.

Parry: At 11th level, a halfling can choose to use the parry action. The halfling’s player declares that their character is parrying at the beginning of the round before initiative is rolled. The halfling makes no attacks during the round (and therefore needs no initiative score), but all incoming attacks are made at a –4 penalty.

Breath Evasion: At 15th level and higher, a halfling only takes half damage from all breath weapons such as those used by dragons. If the attack normally allows a saving throw for half damage then the halfling only takes a quarter of normal damage if they save successfully.

Magic-User

 

Table 4-7: Magic-user abilities by level
Spells per day by spell level Saving Throws
Level Experience Hit Dice Base Attack Bonus Skills Weapon Feats 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 Death Ray / Poison Magic Wands Paralysis / Petrify Breath Weapon Rod / Staff / Spell
1 0 1d4 1 4 2 1 13 14 13 16 15
2 2500 2d4 1 4 2 2 13 14 13 16 15
3 5000 3d4 1 4 3 2 1 13 14 13 16 15
4 10000 4d4 1 4 3 2 2 13 14 13 16 14
5 20000 5d4 2 5 3 2 2 1 12 13 12 15 14
6 40000 6d4 2 5 4 3 2 2 12 13 12 15 13
7 80000 7d4 3 5 4 3 2 2 1 11 12 11 14 13
8 150000 8d4 3 5 4 3 3 2 2 11 12 11 14 12
9 300000 9d4 3 6 5 3 3 2 2 1 11 12 11 14 11
10 450000 9d4+1 4 6 5 4 3 3 2 2 10 11 10 13 11
11 600000 9d4+2 4 6 6 4 4 4 3 2 10 11 10 13 10
12 750000 9d4+3 5 6 6 4 4 4 3 2 1 9 10 9 12 10
13 900000 9d4+4 5 7 6 5 4 4 3 2 2 9 10 9 12 9
14 1050000 9d4+5 5 7 6 5 4 4 4 3 2 9 10 9 12 8
15 1200000 9d4+6 6 7 7 5 4 4 4 3 2 1 8 9 8 11 8
16 1350000 9d4+7 6 7 7 5 5 5 4 3 2 2 8 9 8 11 7
17 1500000 9d4+8 7 8 7 6 5 5 4 4 3 2 7 8 7 10 7
18 1650000 9d4+9 7 8 7 6 5 5 4 4 3 2 1 7 8 7 10 6
19 1800000 9d4+10 7 8 7 6 5 5 5 4 3 2 2 7 8 7 10 6
20 1950000 9d4+11 8 8 7 6 5 5 5 4 4 3 2 6 7 6 9 5
21 2100000 9d4+12 8 9 7 6 5 5 5 4 4 3 2 1 6 7 6 9 5
22 2250000 9d4+13 9 9 7 6 6 5 5 5 4 3 2 2 5 6 5 8 4
23 2400000 9d4+14 9 9 8 6 6 6 6 5 4 3 3 2 5 6 5 8 4
24 2550000 9d4+15 9 9 8 7 7 6 6 5 5 4 3 2 5 5 5 7 4
25 2700000 9d4+16 10 10 8 7 7 6 6 5 5 4 4 3 4 5 4 7 3
26 2850000 9d4+17 10 10 8 7 7 7 6 6 5 5 4 3 4 4 4 6 3
27 3000000 9d4+18 11 10 8 7 7 7 6 6 5 5 5 4 4 4 4 6 3
28 3150000 9d4+19 11 10 8 8 8 7 6 6 6 6 5 4 4 4 4 5 3
29 3300000 9d4+20 11 11 8 8 8 7 7 7 6 6 5 5 3 3 3 5 2
30 3450000 9d4+21 12 11 9 8 8 8 7 7 7 6 6 5 3 3 3 4 2
31 3600000 9d4+22 12 11 9 8 8 8 7 7 7 7 6 6 3 3 3 4 2
32 3750000 9d4+23 13 11 9 9 8 8 8 8 7 7 7 6 3 3 3 3 2
33 3900000 9d4+24 13 12 9 9 9 9 8 8 8 7 7 7 2 2 2 3 2
34 4050000 9d4+25 13 12 9 9 9 9 9 8 8 8 8 7 2 2 2 2 2
35 4200000 9d4+26 14 12 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 8 8 8 2 2 2 2 2
36 4350000 9d4+27 15 12 10 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 2 2 2 2 2

 

Class Description: Magic-users are human characters who have studied the arcane arts and who are able to cast magical spells.

Unlike the inherently magical elves, magic does not come easily to humans, and prospective magic-users must study for years before they are able to master it. In some larger cities such studying is done in a university, but in more rural areas with fewer resources and fewer people it is more likely to be a master / apprentice system. Unfortunately either kind of study leaves little time for other pursuits and this means that magic-users tend to be somewhat lacking in more physical traits and skills.

In an adventuring party, a magic-user makes excellent artillery with a wide range of offensive spells; but must be protected by other characters as they are physically weak. At low levels, the small number of spells that a magic-user has can make them almost a liability to their party—but wise parties look after their magic-users since should they survive to high level they will begin to wield awesome destructive power.

Equipment Restrictions: Magic-users may not wear armour or use shields and may not use most weapons. The only weapons they may use are daggers, staves, slings, whips, pistols, nets and blowguns.

Magic-User Abilities (See Table 4-7)

Hit Points: Magic-users gain 1d4 hit points per level of experience until 9th level. They add their Con bonus to each of these rolls. After 9th level, magic-users gain 1 hit point per level and do not add additional Con bonuses (but do retain the bonuses to previous rolls).

Base Attack Bonus: A magic-user’s attack bonus is based on their level. See Chapter 10: Combat for details of how this translates into to-hit numbers for different armour classes.

Skills: A magic-user starts with 4 skill points plus extra points equal to their Int bonus. These points can be used on the same skill or different skills.

Magic-users gain more skill points as they rise in level. See Chapter 5: Skills for the list of available skills.

Weapon Feats: Magic-users start with two weapon feats, which must be spent immediately on basic proficiency with two different weapons. See Chapter 6: Weapon Feats for a description of how weapon feats work. Magic-users gain more weapon feats as they rise in level, but these weapon feats can not be spent immediately upon gaining the level. See Chapter 11: Gaining Experience for further details.

Spells: Magic-users can cast magic-user spells. See Chapter 7: Spells for detailed descriptions of these spells.

Providing a magic-user has had a good night’s sleep (8 hours), they can spend an hour studying their spell book after waking up in order to gain spells for the day as indicated on table 4-7.

A 1st level magic-user starts with only two spells in their spell book, and must acquire more during their adventures. Magic-users may prepare any spell from their book in either the normal or the reversed form (if the spell has a reversed form), but may not prepare spells from someone else’s book or from a scroll; not even by using a Read Magic spell.

Each prepared spell can be cast once during the day, and if a magic-user wishes to cast a spell more than once then they must prepare the spell more than once, taking up multiple spell slots of the spell’s level. Some magic user spells are reversible. These spells can be reversed in order to have an effect opposite to the normal effect of the spell. A magic-user chooses whether or not to reverse the spell at the time of preparation, not at the time of casting.

A beginning magic-user starts with a spell book given to them by their master, and this spell book will contain the spell Read Magic and one other 1st level spell of the player’s choice. This spell book is a gift from the character’s master and does not need to be paid for.

See Chapter 7: Spells for more information on spells and spell casting.

Saving Throws: Magic-users make saving throws using the target difficulties listed on table 4-7.

Mystic

Class Description: Mystics are human characters who have undergone intense physical and mental training in order to unlock their inner potential via martial arts and meditation.

Mystics are trained in isolated monasteries where they live an ascetic life in seclusion from the distractions of the civilised world. While many are content to live their lives in these monasteries, some venture out into the world once their training is complete—whether from a desire to do good deeds or from a desire to use their talents for personal gain.

The special mystic training allows the character to exceed normal human limits. Their incredible speed and agility provides them with unsurpassed ability in unarmed combat.

However, mystics that wander away from their monastery must still obey the code of behaviour instilled into them during their training if they are to keep their minds strong enough to use their abilities. This code consists of:

  • Never tell an untruth. Dissembling and lies of omission are acceptable, but not knowingly false statements.

  • Own only what you can carry. A wandering mystic must be able to travel freely without concern for goods and homes left behind, and is therefore forbidden by their code from owning any possessions they can not personally carry around with them. Note that this is not a vow of poverty. A mystic is allowed by their code to be wealthy, as long as their riches are portable.

  • Trust your abilities. A mystic who doubts their own abilities lacks the confidence to use them properly, therefore the code does not allow mystics to augment the defensive capabilities of their discipline (i.e. their enhanced armour class) with magic or mundane means.

Within an adventuring party, mystics can prove to be able warriors, though not quite as able as fighters; and back this talent up with useful scouting skills.

Equipment Restrictions: Mystics may not wear any armour or use any shield. Additionally, because of their adherence to a strict code of self-reliance, they are not allowed to use other armour class boosting items such as rings of protection. They may use any weapon, but rarely do since they are often better using their discipline to attack.

Mystic Abilities (See Table 4-8)

Hit Points: Mystics gain 1d6 hit points per level of experience until 9th level. They add their Con bonus to each of these rolls. After 9th level, mystics gain 2 hit points per level and do not add additional Con bonuses (but do retain the bonuses to previous rolls).

Base Attack Bonus: A mystic’s attack bonus is based on their level. See Chapter 10: Combat for details of how this translates into to-hit numbers for different armour classes.

Skills: A mystic starts with 4 skill points plus extra points equal to their Int bonus. These points can be used on the same skill or different skills. Mystics gain more skill points as they rise in level. See Chapter 5: Skills for the list of available skills.

Weapon Feats: Mystics start with two weapon feats, which must be spent immediately on basic proficiency with two different weapons. See Chapter 6: Weapon Feats for a description of how weapon feats work. Mystics gain more weapon feats as they rise in level, but these weapon feats can not be spent immediately upon gaining the level. See Chapter 11: Gaining Experience for further details.

Armour Class: Although mystics cannot wear armour or use defensive items, their armour class increases as they go up levels and improve their martial arts. The armour class of a mystic of a particular level is listed on table 4-8.

Movement Rate: Mystics increase their movement rate as they increase in level. The movement of a mystic of a particular level (in feet per round) is listed on table 4-8.

Strike to Kill Attacks: When a mystic reaches 5th level, they can make two attacks per round while they are unarmed and attacking using their martial arts to kill their opponents.

They do not get the extra attack when using weapons or when using the unarmed strikes proficiency to stun foes (see Chapter 6: Weapon Feats for more details about the unarmed strikes proficiency). At 9th level this increases to three attacks per round, and at 13th level it increases again to 4 attacks per round.

Strike to Kill Damage: When attacking while unarmed, a mystic can choose to do strike to kill when using the unarmed strikes proficiency instead of striking to stun (see Chapter 6: Weapon Feats for further details). If they do so, they do more damage (and strength bonuses apply as normal), but lose the chance to stun or knock out their opponent.

This damage starts at 1d4 at 1st level, and increases with level until it reaches a maximum of 3d12 damage at 16th level. The damage done by a mystic of a particular level is listed on table 4-8.

Unarmed Attack As: Because of the semi-magical nature of a mystic’s martial arts, their unarmed attacks (whether striking to stun or to kill) count as if they are magical for the purposes of determining whether they can affect creatures who may be immune to non-magical weapons.

At 2nd level a mystic’s unarmed attacks can hit creatures only hurt by silver weapons, and at 5th level they can start to hit creatures only hit by magic weapons. The effective bonus of the mystic’s attacks continues to increase as listed in table 4-8.

It is important to note that this bonus is only used to determine whether or not a mystic is capable of hurting an opponent. The mystic does not actually get this bonus on their to hit or damage rolls.

Find Traps: A mystic’s trained senses are able to detect the presence of traps on objects or in areas. Table 4-8 lists the percentage chance of finding each trap in an area. The mystic does not automatically get to roll for this ability. Their player must state that the character is searching the area.

The Game Master should roll the dice and inform the mystic’s player whether any traps were found. If no traps are found the mystic will not know whether it is because there were no traps or whether they simply failed to notice them. In some cases a particularly well hidden (or badly hidden) trap may cause there to be a modifier to the mystic’s roll.

Remove Traps: If a mystic is aware of the existence of a trap, they may try to disarm it to prevent it from being triggered. The percentage chance of this ability working successfully is listed on table 4-8.

Should this ability fail, the trap will be activated. In some cases a particularly complex (or simple) trap may cause there to be a modifier to the mystic’s roll.

A mystic may try multiple times to remove the same trap, although since the trap is activated each time the mystic tries, doing so can be a dangerous activity.

Climb Walls: Mystics are able to climb walls and other sheer surfaces. The percentage chance of success is listed in table 4-8. The mystic’s player must roll for each 100’ or part of 100’ climbed, with a failure indicating that the mystic has fallen half way through the climb. See Chapter 9: Dungeon Delving for details about falling.

In some cases a slippery or smooth surface (or a particularly rough one) may cause there to be a modifier to the mystic’s roll.

Move Silently: Mystics are able to move without being heard. The percentage chance of success is listed in table 4-8. The mystic’s player must roll for each round of movement, with a failure indicating that the mystic has made a sound that others might hear.

The Game Master should roll the dice when the mystic is sneaking, so that the mystic’s player does not know whether or not their character has been heard.

Hide In Shadows: A mystic is able to hide effectively providing there is cover or shadows to hide in. The percentage chance of success is listed in table 4-8.

The Game Master should roll the dice when the mystic is hiding, so that the mystic’s player does not know whether or not their character has been spotted.

The Game Master must roll for the initial hiding, and then for each round of movement, with a failure indicating that the mystic has temporarily become visible. If someone is watching the mystic before they start to hide, they will still be able to see the mystic regardless of the success or otherwise of this skill.

Saving Throws: Mystics make saving throws using the target difficulties listed on table 4-8.

Alertness: When a fight suddenly breaks out, or when two groups come face to face abruptly, a 2nd level or higher mystic is only surprised if their player rolls a 1 on a d6, rather than the normal 1-2 on a d6. See Chapter 10: Combat for more details on surprise.

Self Healing: Starting at 4th level, once per day, a mystic can spend a round concentrating and heal themselves 1 hit point per level that they have.

Speak With Animals: A 6th level or higher mystic is able to understand the speech of any animal, and is able to make any animal understand their speech. This is a mental ability, not a physical one. If conversing with a dog, the mystic does not actually growl and bark but talks normally—reaching into the dog’s mind to make it understand.

This ability does not bestow any extra intelligence to the animal. Neither does it force the animal to obey or even co-operate with the mystic.

Spell Resistance: At 8th level and higher, a mystic only takes half damage from all spells and spell-like abilities. If the attack normally allows a saving throw for half damage then the mystic only takes a quarter of normal damage if they save successfully.

Breath Evasion: At 8th level and higher, a mystic only takes half damage from all breath weapons such as those used by dragons. If the attack normally allows a saving throw for half damage then the mystic only takes a quarter of normal damage if they save successfully.

Smash: At 9th level, a mystic gains the ability to make smash attacks in melee. At the beginning of the round, the mystic’s player declares that their character is making a smash attack.

The mystic automatically loses initiative, and takes a –5 penalty to their attack roll for the attack. However, if the attack hits then the mystic gets to add their strength score to the damage done by the attack as well as their strength bonus. See Chapter 10: Combat for details of smash attacks. A mystic can use their smash attack either with a weapon or with a single unarmed attack.

Parry: At 9th level, a mystic can choose to use the parry action. The mystic’s player declares that their character is parrying at the beginning of the round before initiative is rolled. The mystic makes no attacks during the round (and therefore needs no initiative score), but all incoming attacks are made at a –4 penalty.

Speak With Anyone: At 10th level, a mystic’s Speak with Animals ability is no longer limited to animals and can now be used to speak with any creature that has a natural language.

Mind Blank: Starting at 12th level, mystics are immune to Charm, Quest and Geas spells, Hold and Slow spells, and ESP.

Fade: At 14th level and higher, a mystic can make themselves fade from view once per day. This is a mental effect rather than a physical invisibility effect, so spells and abilities that can detect the presence of invisible creatures do not detect the mystic. The fade lasts for up to one round per level of the mystic, and stops instantly if the mystic does something to attract attention to themselves such as attacking or speaking.

Dim Mak: At 16th level and higher, a mystic is able to touch an opponent with the dreaded Dim Mak ability once per day.

The Dim Mak touch can have one of the following effects on the target, who gets no saving throw against the affect but must have no more hit dice or levels than the mystic:

  • Charm Person (as the spell of the same name, except lasting only 24 hours)

  • Cureall (as the spell of the same name)

  • Death

  • Quest (as the spell of the same name except lasting only 24 hours)

  • Paralysis (lasting 24 hours)

The Dim Mak ability can only be used once per day, and the desired effect must be announced before the attack is made. However, if the attack misses then the Dim Mak is not used up and can be attempted again against the same target or a different target.

Thief

 

Table 4-9: Thief abilities by level
Thief Abilities Saving Throws
Level Experience Hit Dice Base Attack Bonus Skills Weapon Feats Open Locks Find Traps Remove Traps Climb Walls Move Silently Hide In Shadows Pick Pockets Hear Noise Read Languages Use Magic-User Scroll Death Ray / Poison Magic Wands Paralysis / Petrify Breath Weapon Rod / Staff / Spell
1 0 1d4 1 4 2 15 10 10 87 20 10 20 30 13 14 13 16 15
2 1200 2d4 1 4 2 20 15 15 88 25 15 25 35 13 14 13 16 15
3 2400 3d4 1 4 3 25 20 20 89 30 20 30 40 13 14 13 16 15
4 4800 4d4 2 4 3 30 25 25 90 35 24 35 45 80 12 13 12 15 14
5 9600 5d4 2 5 3 35 30 30 91 40 28 40 50 80 12 13 12 15 14
6 20000 6d4 3 5 4 40 35 34 92 44 32 45 54 80 11 12 11 14 13
7 40000 7d4 3 5 4 45 40 38 93 48 35 50 58 80 11 12 11 14 13
8 80000 8d4 4 5 4 50 45 42 94 52 38 55 62 80 10 11 10 13 12
9 160000 9d4 4 6 5 54 50 46 95 55 41 60 66 80 10 11 10 13 12
10 280000 9d4+2 5 6 5 58 54 50 96 58 44 65 70 80 90 9 10 9 12 11
11 400000 9d4+4 5 6 6 62 58 54 97 61 47 70 74 80 90 9 10 9 12 11
12 520000 9d4+6 6 6 6 66 62 58 98 64 50 75 78 80 90 8 9 8 11 10
13 640000 9d4+8 6 7 6 69 66 61 99 66 53 80 81 80 90 8 9 8 11 10
14 760000 9d4+10 7 7 6 72 70 64 100 68 56 85 84 80 90 7 8 7 10 9
15 880000 9d4+12 7 7 7 75 73 67 101 70 58 90 87 80 90 7 8 7 10 9
16 1000000 9d4+14 8 7 7 78 76 70 102 72 60 95 90 80 90 6 7 6 9 8
17 1120000 9d4+16 8 8 7 81 80 73 103 74 62 100 92 80 90 6 7 6 9 8
18 1240000 9d4+18 9 8 7 84 83 76 104 76 64 105 94 80 90 5 6 5 8 7
19 1360000 9d4+20 9 8 7 86 86 79 105 78 66 110 96 80 90 5 6 5 8 7
20 1480000 9d4+22 10 8 7 88 89 82 106 80 68 115 98 80 90 5 6 5 7 6
21 1600000 9d4+24 10 9 7 90 92 85 107 82 70 120 100 80 90 4 5 4 7 6
22 1720000 9d4+26 11 9 7 92 94 88 108 84 72 125 102 80 90 4 5 4 6 5
23 1840000 9d4+28 11 9 8 94 96 91 109 86 74 130 104 80 90 4 5 4 6 5
24 1960000 9d4+30 12 9 8 96 98 94 110 88 76 135 106 80 90 4 5 4 5 5
25 2080000 9d4+34 12 10 8 98 99 97 111 89 78 140 108 80 90 3 4 3 5 4
26 2200000 9d4+36 13 10 8 100 100 100 112 90 80 145 110 80 90 3 4 3 4 4
27 2320000 9d4+38 13 10 8 102 101 103 113 91 82 150 112 80 90 3 4 3 4 4
28 2440000 9d4+40 14 10 8 104 102 106 114 92 84 155 114 80 90 3 4 3 4 4
29 2560000 9d4+42 14 11 8 106 103 109 115 93 86 160 116 80 90 2 3 2 3 3
30 2680000 9d4+44 15 11 9 108 104 112 116 94 88 165 118 80 90 2 3 2 3 2
31 2800000 9d4+46 15 11 9 110 105 115 117 95 90 170 120 80 90 2 3 2 3 2
32 2920000 9d4+48 16 11 9 112 106 118 118 96 92 175 122 80 90 2 3 2 3 2
33 3040000 9d4+50 16 12 9 114 107 121 118 97 94 180 124 80 90 2 2 2 2 2
34 3160000 9d4+52 17 12 9 116 108 124 119 98 96 185 126 80 90 2 2 2 2 2
35 3280000 9d4+54 17 12 9 118 109 127 119 99 98 190 128 80 90 2 2 2 2 2
36 3400000 9d4+56 18 12 10 120 110 130 120 100 100 195 130 80 90 2 2 2 2 2

 

Class Description: Thieves are human characters who specialise in subterfuge and trickery. They come from all social classes, from bored nobles seeking excitement to well trained and subtle assassins to self-taught former street urchins.

Although the class is called “thief”, thief characters are not always dishonest and do not always steal. Many of them use their talents for good rather than for personal benefit, and work as scouts and adventurers. Even the most noble and honest adventuring parties often need to bypass traps and locks or to have someone who can scout ahead without being seen, and many so-called ‘thieves’ spend their adventuring careers in this type of activity and never steal a coin in their lives.

Adventuring parties find the talents of thieves extremely useful, although thieves do not make the greatest warriors so may need protecting in large fights.

Equipment Restrictions: Thieves may use any one-handed weapon, and may use leather armour. Since they must travel lightly in order to use their abilities they may not use two-handed weapons or shields. Thieves may use any missile weapon.

Thief Abilities (See Table 4-9)

Hit Points: Thieves gain 1d4 hit points per level of experience until 9th level. They add their Con bonus to each of these rolls. After 9th level, thieves gain 2 hit points per level and do not add additional Con bonuses (but do retain the bonuses to previous rolls).

Base Attack Bonus: A thief’s attack bonus is based on their level. See Chapter 10: Combat for details of how this translates into to-hit numbers for different armour classes.

Skills: A thief starts with 4 skill points plus extra points equal to their Int bonus. These points can be used on the same skill or different skills. Thieves gain more skill points as they rise in level. See Chapter 5: Skills for the list of available skills.

Weapon Feats: Thieves start with two weapon feats, which must be spent immediately on basic proficiency with two different weapons. See Chapter 6: Weapon Feats for a description of how weapon feats work. Thieves gain more weapon feats as they rise in level, but these weapon feats can not be spent immediately upon gaining the level. See Chapter 11: Gaining Experience for further details.

Sneak Attack: If a thief is able to strike an opponent who is not aware of the thief’s location, the thief can add +4 to their attack roll and if the attack hits it does twice the normal damage that the attack would normally do. Should a thief make two simultaneous attacks (because they are wielding two weapons) then both attacks get the +4 bonus and do double damage if they hit.

Simply being behind an enemy is not enough to get a sneak attack. The thief must actually be hidden, invisible, or otherwise concealed, and their location must not be known to their target.

The sneak attack may be made with a melee attack or with a missile, thrown or hurled weapon at short range.

Open Locks: If a thief is in possession of a set of lock picks, or tools that can make improvised lock picks, they can attempt to pick any lock with a percentage chance of success listed in table 4-9. Doing so will set off any trap that the lock is armed with unless the trap has been removed or otherwise disabled. In some cases a particularly complex (or simple) lock may cause there to be a modifier to the thief’s roll.

A thief is only allowed one attempt to pick each lock they encounter. Should they fail then they will not be able to try to open that lock again until they have increased in level.

Find Traps: A thief’s trained senses are able to detect the presence of traps on objects or in areas. Table 4-9 lists the percentage chance of finding each trap in an area. The thief does not automatically get to roll for this ability. Their player must state that the character is searching the area. The Game Master should roll the dice and inform the thief’s player whether any traps were found.

If no traps are found the thief will not know whether it is because there were no traps or whether they simply failed to notice them. In some cases a particularly well hidden (or badly hidden) trap may cause there to be a modifier to the thief’s roll.

Remove Traps: If a thief is aware of the existence of a trap, they may try to disarm it to prevent it from being triggered. The percentage chance of this ability working successfully is listed on table 4-9. Should this ability fail, the trap will be activated. In some cases a particularly complex (or simple) trap may cause there to be a modifier to the thief’s roll.

A thief may try multiple times to remove the same trap, although since the trap is activated each time the thief tries, doing so can be a dangerous activity.

Climb Walls: Thieves are able to climb walls and other sheer surfaces. The percentage chance of success is listed in table 4-9. The thief’s player must roll for each 100’ or part of 100’ climbed, with a failure indicating that the thief has fallen half way through the climb. See Chapter 9: Dungeon Delving for details about falling.

In some cases a slippery or smooth surface (or a particularly rough one) may cause there to be a modifier to the thief’s roll.

Move Silently: Thieves are able to move without being heard. The percentage chance of success is listed in table 4-9. The thief’s player must roll for each round of movement, with a failure indicating that the thief has made a sound that others might hear. The Game Master should roll the dice when the thief is sneaking, so that the thief’s player does not know whether or not their character has been heard.

Hide In Shadows: A thief is able to hide effectively providing there is cover or shadows to hide in. The percentage chance of success is listed in table 4-9. The thief’s player must roll for the initial hiding, and then for each round of movement, with a failure indicating that the thief has temporarily become visible.

The Game Master should roll the dice when the thief is hiding, so that the thief’s player does not know whether or not their character has been spotted. If someone is watching the thief before they start to hide, they will still be able to see the thief regardless of the success or otherwise of this skill.

Pick Pockets: A thief is able to pick the pockets of others in order to steal small items from them, with a base percentage chance of success listed in table 4-9. This ability can be used to steal purses or belt pouches, or even steal a weapon from its scabbard, but cannot be used to steal anything that is being held by the target or is strapped onto the target such as a backpack or armour.

The base chance of success is reduced by 5% for each hit dice of the target.

The thief’s player must state the item that they wish to steal before rolling. If the thief rolls equal to or less than their modified chance of success then they successfully steal the item. If they roll more than their modified chance of success but less than or equal to twice that chance then they are unable to steal the item but their attempted theft goes unnoticed.

If they roll more than twice their modified chance of success, or roll a 00, then not only are they unable to steal the item but they are also noticed in the attempt by the target of the theft.

Hear Noise: If a thief listens quietly at a door, window, or thin wall then they have a percentage chance of hearing faint noises that other characters would miss as listed on table 4-9. The thief must be in quiet conditions to use this ability—noisy chatter of other characters or fighting swamps any noises that might be heard.

The Game Master should roll for the success of this ability so that if the result is negative the thief’s player does not know whether this was because the roll failed or because there was nothing to hear.

Read Languages: At 4th level or higher, a thief has an 80% chance to be able to decipher any non-magical written language or code.

This only works on written text and cannot be used to understand spoken languages.

Use Magic-User Scroll: Beginning at 10th level, a thief has a 90% chance of being able to decipher and use any scroll containing a magic-user spell.

Should this roll fail, the spell will still be used up from the scroll but will misfire.

An offensive spell will go off centred on the thief rather than their intended target, and a non-offensive spell will simply fizzle with no effect.

Saving Throws: Thieves make saving throws using the target difficulties listed on table 4-9.

H 5 ABILITY CHECKS AND SKILLS

Characters of different classes have different unique abilities, for example magic-users can cast spells and thieves can pick pockets.

However, there are some things—such as trying to walk along a thin ledge or trying to remember which type of dragon breathes fire and which type breathes frost before venturing into a lair—that any character can attempt.

These situations are handled by ability checks and skills.

Ability Checks

 

Table 5-1: Ability Checks By Ability
Ability Situations where this ability might be checked Skills useful in these situations
Strength Where raw physical strength is required; such as lifting, pushing, or pulling. Intimidation; Jumping; Swimming
Intelligence Where calculation, memory or reasoning ability is required. Arcane Lore; Engineering; Geography; History; Laws; Magical Engineering; Nature Lore; Religious Lore
Wisdom “Where intuition or “common sense” are required. Also where acuity of the senses is required.
Note: Wisdom checks should not be used to replace or duplicate the use of class abilities such as Find Traps.” Cooking; First Aid; Lip Reading; Navigating; Tracking; Sense Motive
Dexterity “Where either agility or fine manipulative skills are required.
Note: Dexterity checks should not be used to replace or duplicate the use of class abilities such as Climb Walls or Move Silently.” Balance; Craft; Escape Artist; Performance; Riding
Constitution Where stamina or raw endurance is required.
Charisma Where personality and smooth talking are required. Bluff; Diplomacy; Disguise; Etiquette; Gambling; Intimidation; Performance

 

In general, adventurers are assumed to be competent individuals who can do things like riding horses, starting camp fires, and swimming in calm water.

If you particularly want to play a character whose competency is deficient in some area, for example if you decide that you specifically want to play a character who can’t swim, then you can do that. However, these rules assume that your character can do all these things in calm situations unless you decide otherwise.

However, sometimes there are situations where your character might fail. Perhaps they are trying to stay on a horse that is bolting in fright. Or perhaps they are trying to light a fire in torrential rain. Or perhaps they are trying to swim in turbulent water without getting washed downstream.

In these cases, the Game Master will call for an Ability Check in order for your character to succeed. To make an ability check, roll 1d20 and compare the score to the relevant ability score on your character sheet. If the roll is equal to or less than your character’s ability score then your character has succeeded. If the roll is higher than your character’s ability score then your character has failed.

The exact consequences of success and failure will depend on the exact situation your character faces, although it should be very rare (but not unheard of) for a failed ability check to result in death, unless the character is attempting something spectacularly risky.

Example: Black Leaf is faced with a problem. She has been granted an audience with Queen Eloise and wishes to use the opportunity to ask for some royal sponsorship to aid her expedition to find the fabled Eye of Harmaz. Unfortunately she is panicking because she cannot remember the proper etiquette and is afraid that she will cause offence.

Marcie, her player, asks the Game Master if she can make an ability check against Black Leaf’s intelligence in order for Black Leaf to “remember” the correct etiquette.

The Game Master agrees and Marcie rolls 1d20, getting a 14. This is higher than Black Leaf’s intelligence score of 8, so the roll fails and Black Leaf fails to remember the correct etiquette for addressing the queen.

Some time later, Black Leaf can be found getting drunk in an inn, her expedition without royal patronage due in part to the queen’s offense at her frightful manners.

Modifiers to Ability Checks

In some circumstances the Game Master may decide that an ability check is particularly easy or hard. Maybe the ledge that the character is balancing on is slippery, or maybe the person that the character is trying to scrutinise in order to see if they are lying is wearing a mask, or maybe the piece of information they are trying to remember is reasonably common knowledge.

In these cases, the Game Master may assign a modifier to the character’s effective ability score when rolling the check. Unless there are exceptional circumstances that would be unknown to the character, the Game Master should always tell the player what modifiers are going to apply before the player rolls.

Example: Elfstar has come across an underground temple where cultists are performing some kind of ritual in front of a statue of a man who she assumes to be an Immortal.

Elfstar’s player, Debbie, wishes to roll an intelligence check in order to recognise the Immortal.

The Game Master knows that although this Immortal is not one who has regular dealings with Elfstar’s home country (if he was, then the Game Master would simply tell Debbie who he is and not require a roll at all) he is commonly worshipped in the local area and so it is likely that Elfstar will have heard of him. He gives her a +4 bonus to her effective intelligence for the roll, modifying it from a 13 to a 17.

Debbie rolls a 17, which is equal to her effective intelligence for the roll—so the Game Master tells her that Elfstar recognises the Immortal and tells her who he is.

Using Skills

Every character starts with 4 skill points, plus an extra skill point per point of intelligence bonus. If a character has an intelligence penalty, then this does not reduce the number of skill points the character has.

Characters also gain extra skill points as they increase in level. See Chapter 4: Creating a Character for details of skill points per level.

These skill points are spent immediately on skills listed in this chapter.

In most cases, each point spent on a particular skill will give your character a +1 bonus to their effective ability score when rolling for ability checks that correspond to the skill.

So a character with a strength of 12 would normally need to roll a 12 to make an ability check to use his strength to swim upstream in a river but if the character’s player has spent two points in the Swimming skill then that character’s strength is effectively 14 when making the check and their player will only need to roll a 14 or less.

Such skill modifiers stack with modifiers applied by the Game Master due to circumstances.

Example: Black Leaf is hot on the trail of the Eye of Harmaz, and comes across a narrow rope bridge spanning a chasm. Unfortunately the guide rope for the rope bridge is missing, so Black Leaf will have to try to balance without its aid if she wishes to cross. The Game Master tells Marcie that she will need to make a Balance check (an ability check against dexterity, using the Balance skill) in order to cross the bridge—but that the strong winds blowing through the chasm will give her a –1 penalty to her effective dexterity.

Black Leaf has a dexterity of 16, and Marcie has spent two points on the Balance skill, so she can add these points to her effective dexterity for the roll.

The two skill points and the wind penalty stack, so overall Marcie is going to have to roll against an effective dexterity of (16+2-1=17). Marcie reckons that this is well worth trying, but tells the Game Master that Black Leaf is looping a rope around the bridge and around her waist so that if she falls off she won’t plummet to her almost certain death at the bottom of the chasm.

She also trails a rope behind her so that after she’s crossed she and the other companions can tie it off so that the less dextrous party members will have a guide rope and not need to cross the bridge the hard way.

Social Skills

Special care needs to be used when using skills designed for social situations (Bluff, Diplomacy,Intimidation and Sense Motive).

Players and Game Masters should discuss the use of these skills before the game starts, since they have the potential to unbalance games.

Firstly, it is recommended that these skills are not used against players. If a player wishes to influence another player then this should be role played rather than rolled for using skills. Many players don’t like the loss of “free will” and the loss of control that they feel when their character is forced into particular behaviour by dice rolls rather than because they wanted their character to behave in that way, especially if the forced behaviour is the result of another player’s use of social skills against them. This can be very disruptive to your gaming group.

Secondly, the players and Game Master should agree what proportion of social interaction with NPCs should be governed by skill usage and what proportion should be governed by role play. Some people prefer more skill usage since it means that people can play silver-tongued characters even if they are not good talkers themselves. Others feel that simply rolling a Diplomacy Check in order to find out whether the character can talk the king into pardoning their wrongly-imprisoned associates is something of a dramatic let-down and prefer to role play the issue to its conclusion. There is no single “correct” way to play using these skills, only the way that your group enjoys.

Special Skills

While most skills simply add bonuses to ability checks, some—notably language skills—work in other ways.

If a skill works in an unusual way, this will be detailed in the skill’s individual description.

Adding New Skills

The list of skills in this chapter is not meant to cover all possible situations. Game Masters may require (or players may ask for) ability checks for a variety of situations other than those given here. If a particular situation crops up repeatedly, a player may—with the Game Master’s permission—spend a skill point in order to buy it as a named skill in order to get a bonus to their effective ability score in that situation.

However, Game Masters and players should be careful that this does not overlap with class abilities, particularly not those of the thief and mystic classes. For example, sneaking up on someone without being heard is a specific thief ability called Move Silently. While in some specific circumstances it may be acceptable for a non-thief player to make a dexterity check in order to have their character sneak up on someone, this should not become standard practice (and players certainly shouldn’t start spending points on a “Stealth” skill to help with it) since that will overlap with—and undermine—the Move Silently ability.

Alphabetical Skill List

 

Table 5-2: Alphabetical Skill List
Skill Ability Check
Arcane Lore Int
Balance Dex
Bluff Cha
Cooking Wis
Craft (Choose Medium) Dex
Diplomacy Cha
Disguise Cha
Engineering Int
Escape Artist Dex
Etiquette (Choose Culture) Cha
First Aid Wis
Gambling Cha
Geography Int
History Int
Intimidation Str or Cha
Jumping Str
Language (Choose)
Laws (Choose Culture) Int
Lip Reading Wis
Magical Engineering Int
Nature Lore Int
Navigating Wis
Performance (Choose Medium) Cha
Religious Lore Int
Riding (Choose Animal) Dex
Sense Motive Wis
Swimming Str
Tracking Wis

Arcane Lore

Each point spent on the Arcane Lore skill gives a +1 bonus to Intelligence Checks made to recognise spells, magical effects, and magical creatures.

An “average” spell or effect (at the Game Master’s discretion) will give no bonus or penalty to the effective intelligence used for the roll, but a particularly common spell might give a bonus and a particularly rare spell might give a penalty. Relative obscurity is more important in this regard than level of power.

Note: Arcane Lore checks should not be used to allow the players to identify magic items without using the Analyze spell.

Balance

Each point spent on the Balance skill gives a +1 bonus to Dexterity Checks made to keep one’s footing on a small (or moving) surface or to cross narrow ledges, beams or even tightropes.

Modifiers to the effective dexterity score used for the roll can come from a wide variety of factors. Examples include:

  • Strong wind

  • Slippery surfaces

  • Heavily encumbered character

  • Trying to move quicker (or slower) than a normal walk

  • Particularly narrow (or wide) ledges

  • Trying to balance while dodging attacks

  • Using a pole for balance

Bluff

Each point spent on the Bluff skill gives a +1 bonus to Charisma Checks made to convince NPCs of things without evidence. While the skill is most often used to convince NPCs of untruths, it can also be used to make a convincing emotional argument in favour of something you know is true but cannot prove to be true.

Bluff checks should get modifiers for both the plausibility of what is being claimed and the potential consequences of the bluff to the target of the skill. A guard who may get executed if they let a potential assassin into the royal palace will be harder to bluff your way past than a merchant who may make a bit less profit if you manage to convince him that you should get a discount because you’re a member of the city watch.

Note: See Social Skills for a warning about how some uses of this skill may disrupt the game.

Cooking

Each point spent on the Cooking skill gives a +1 bonus to Wisdom Checks made to cook.

Modifiers to the effective wisdom used for this roll are likely to be only rarely needed, except in the case of not having adequate equipment or when using ingredients that the character has never cooked before.

In most cases, failing a cooking check won’t result in inedible food; merely food that is not as nice as that produced by a successful cooking check.

Craft (Choose Medium)

The Craft skill is not a single skill. It is a group of related skills used when making things of different types. When spending a skill point on this skill, you must specify what sort of craft your character is skilled at.

An exhaustive list of possible craft skills is not possible, but examples include:

  • Carpentry

  • Smithing

  • Fletching

  • Skinning

  • Leatherworking

  • Rope Binding

  • Tailoring

  • Gem Cutting

  • Forgery

  • Masonry

  • Thatching

  • Drawing/Painting

  • Sculpture

Each skill point spent on a specific craft skill gives a +1 bonus to Dexterity Checks used to make items with that craft.

Modifiers to the effective dexterity used in craft rolls can come from high or low quality materials and tools, as well as time constraints.

Depending on what is being made, success may be not be an all-or-nothing affair—a failed craft check is likely to still result in a finished item. However, the quality of the finished product should be subjectively determined by the amount that the craft check succeeded by or failed by.

Craft skills can also be used to assess the workmanship of items made using that skill. For example skill at carpentry can be used to help find the weak spot in a door, or skill at smithing can help judge how good a sword is. The exact details of this are left to the Game Master’s discretion. However, in no case should a craft skill be able to be used to determine magical properties of an item.

Diplomacy

Each point spent on the Diplomacy skill gives a +1 bonus to Charisma Checks made to work out compromises and calm tensions.

Diplomacy checks should get modifiers for both the amount of hostility between the parties and the amount that either side has to lose if the diplomacy fails. For example, trying to persuade the leader of a marauding band of orcs not to attack a small and lightly armed party is going to be much more difficult than trying to persuade an offended landlady that you shouldn’t be thrown out of her inn and you should be allowed to spend your spare cash there instead.

Note: See Social Skills for a warning about how some uses of this skill may disrupt the game.

Disguise

Each point spent on the Disguise skill gives a +1 bonus to Charisma Checks made to disguise a character as someone else.

These checks should be made when the disguise is first worn; with modifiers based on the answers to the following:

  • Is the disguise meant to look like a specific person, or merely not look like the wearer?

  • Is the disguise intended to make the character look like a different gender and/or race?

  • Is the disguise meant to only be seen in from a distance or is it intended for close scrutiny?

  • Is the disguise intended to fool close acquaintances of subject (or wearer) of the disguise?

  • Does the person applying the disguise have access to make up and prosthetics?

The exact value of these modifiers should be determined by the Game Master on a case by case basis, and the Game Master should roll the dice for the check so that the player doesn’t know whether their character’s disguise will successfully fool people.

A disguise that fails to achieve its target intentions may still work to a lesser extent.

Example: Black Leaf wishes to gain access to the back room of the cartographer’s guild in order to steal a map that she thinks may be there despite the guild members’ denials. While her allies “accidentally” encounter one of the guild members in an inn and get him drunk, Black Leaf disguises herself as the guild member.

The Game Master decides that because Black Leaf is trying to impersonate a specific person of the opposite gender, she should get a –4 penalty to her effective charisma when making the disguise check.

However, since she has deliberately chosen to impersonate the guild member who most closely resembles her in terms of build and facial features (gender notwithstanding) the Game Master reduces the penalty to a –3.

Unfortunately Black Leaf’s charisma is only a rather average 11, and the penalty means it is effectively only an 8 for this roll. The Game Master rolls a 10.

Since she only failed by a small amount—and would have succeeded if not for the penalties—the Game Master decides that Black Leaf’s disguise is not going to fool people into thinking she is the guild member unless seen only from a distance, but is enough that people seeing her will not recognise her real identity.

Engineering

Each point spent on the Engineering skill gives a +1 bonus to Intelligence Checks made to design machinery or identify the function of existing machinery such as siege weaponry or orreries.

Modifiers to these the effective intelligence used for checks to identify machinery should come from the complexity of the machinery being examined.

In terms of the design of machinery, the Game Master should also take into account the technological level of the campaign and should veto the “invention” of devices that rely on principles unknown in the game world. Similarly, the presence of magic in the game world may mean that the laws of nature work differently there than in the real world, so at the Game Master’s discretion machinery relying on certain physical principles (e.g. combustion powered guns or engines) may not work at all.

Note: Although this skill can be used to identify how a large mechanical trap works, it should not be used as a replacement for either the Find Traps or Remove Traps abilities. At best, knowing how the trap functions may give insight into how the trap may be bypassed by mundane means.

Escape Artist

Each point spent on the Escape Artist skill gives a +1 bonus to Dexterity Checks made to escape from bonds or ties.

The effective dexterity used for this check should be modified by the extent to which the character is tied. Escaping from simply having ones hands tied with a scarf should be much easier than escaping from iron manacles.

Note: Although this skill allows the character to wriggle free from locked manacles or padlocked chains, it does not allow the actual picking of those locks.

Etiquette (Choose Culture)

The Etiquette skill is not a single skill. It is a group of related skills used in social situations in a variety of cultures.

Each point spent in the etiquette skill for a particular culture gives a +1 bonus to Charisma Rolls used to behave properly in formal social situations in that culture.

Modifiers to the effective charisma used for these checks should come from particularly common or particularly obscure social situations within that culture.

First Aid

Each point spent in the First Aid skill gives a +1 bonus on Wisdom Rolls used to treat injuries.

The most common use of this skill is to prevent people from dying once they have reached 0 hit points. See Chapter 10: Combat for detailed rules on death and dying. This use of the skill can be performed during combat, and can be used multiple times until it succeeds.

The other use of the skill is to patch people up after they have taken damage. After each time a character has been injured (a whole combat only counts as a single injury for this purpose) they can be healed 1d3 of the hit points lost in this particular injury by someone making a successful first aid check. Each character using the skill is only able to make one attempt per injury, and if this first attempt fails then further attempts will not succeed.

If someone succeeds with a first aid check against a particular injury then further first aid checks will be of no benefit.

There are normally no modifiers to the effective wisdom used in First Aid checks.

Example: Black Leaf is unlucky enough to fall down a pit, and is injured, taking 5 points of damage out of her 9 hit points, leaving her on 4 hit points.

She uses the first aid skill to treat this injury, and succeeds in her roll. Her player rolls 1d3 to see how many hit points are recovered and unfortunately only gets a 1. Black Leaf now recovers one of the hit points lost in the injury, taking her from 4 hit points to 5 hit points.

Since she has now had this injury treated, further first aid rolls won’t be able to recover any more of the lost hit points.

Shortly afterwards, the party encounters some goblins spoiling for a fight. After a brief combat with the goblins, Black Leaf has lost another 2 hit points, leaving her with 3. While the party are resting, she tries to use the first aid skill on herself in order to recover some of these hit points. The skill check is not successful and Black Leaf is unable to heal this injury, and cannot try again.

Seeing that her friend is still injured, Elfstar tries to use the skill on her. Elfstar’s player succeeds her skill check and rolls 1d3 to see how much is healed, getting a 3. Although Black Leaf has lost a total of 6 hit points, only 2 were lost in the injury being treated by the skill roll, so the first aid can only result in the recovery of these 2 hit points.

Gambling

Each point spent on the Gambling skill gives a +1 bonus to Charisma Checks made to determine who wins in games of skill and chance.

Modifiers to the effective charisma used for gambling checks should be rare, but may be used for games that the character is unfamiliar with.

The simple way to use this skill is to simulate a single game or round in a game, by each character making a gambling check, and the game or round is won by the character who succeeds their roll by the biggest margin (or fails by the least margin, if no character succeeds).

At the Game Master’s discretion, individual gambling games can be devised for their game world, which may operate on a more complex basis.

Note: This skill is designed for games where psychology, bluffing, and second-guessing opponents are an essential part of the game play. The skill does not represent a supernatural “luck” type of ability and should not be used to determine the outcome of games of pure chance.

Geography

Each point spent on the Geography skill gives a +1 bonus to Intelligence Checks made to recollect information about countries and regions of the game world.

The use of this skill should be modified by the obscurity of the facts that the player wishes their character to recollect. Knowing the name of a country and the majority race that lives there should be easier than knowing the name of the palace in which the king of that country lives or knowing the major trade imports and exports of that country.

History

Each point spent on the History skill gives a +1 bonus to Intelligence Checks made to recollect information about the game world’s past.

The use of this skill should be modified by the obscurity of the facts that the player wishes their character to recollect. Knowing the name of countries involved in a war a couple of generations ago should be easier than knowing the name of the vizier of an empire that hasn’t existed for thousands of years.

Intimidation

Each point spent on the Intimidation skill gives a +1 bonus to both Charisma Checks and Strength Checks made to bully an NPC into co-operation through threats or shows of physical strength.

Intimidation checks should get modifiers for both the plausibility of the threats being made and the potential consequences to the target of the skill for co-operation.

Using a threat of immediate physical violence to get a bandit to flee is both a realistic threat and has only minor consequences to the bandit if they do flee; so it should be easier than using a threat of sending a dragon to kill the family of an ogre if they don’t betray their tribe’s location to you, which is both an unrealistic threat and has potentially fatal consequences to the ogre and their tribe.

Note: See Social Skills for a warning about how some uses of this skill may disrupt the game.

Jumping

Each point spent on the Jumping skill gives a +1 bonus to Strength Checks made to jump long distances.

Rather than giving modifiers to the effective strength based on the intended length or height of the jump, the nature of jumping means that a jump will always be successfully made but the distance of the jump will depend on the result of the check.

With a running start, a character can jump 10’ horizontally or 4’ vertically (remember that if the character is jumping up to reach something then the character’s height should be added to the vertical distance jumped in order to determine how high they can reach).

The effects of the roll depend on whether the character is jumping for height or length.

For each point that the character succeeds the jump check by in the case of a long jump, they jump an extra foot horizontally; for each two points that the character fails the jump check by they jump a foot less horizontally.

In the case of a high jump, for each two points the character succeeds the jump roll by they jump a foot higher, and for each four points the character fails by they jump a foot less high.

In either case, jumping from a standing start means that only half of the total distance (after modification) can be jumped.

Example: Black Leaf has a strength of only 9, but has spent two skill points on the jump skill—so she has an effective strength of 11 when making jump checks.

After having fallen into a 10’ deep pit, she needs to try to get out. Her player announces that she will try to jump up and grab the edge of the pit.

The pit is 10’ deep, and Black Leaf is 5’5 tall; so in order to reach the edge of the pit she will have to jump just over four and a half feet.

Luckily for Black Leaf, the pit is 20’ wide, so she has chance to get a run up at the jump. Marcie rolls a 6, which is five points better than the 11 that she needed to roll, so Black Leaf jumps two and a half feet more than the default 4’, for a total of six and a half feet—more than enough to grab the edge of the pit and pull herself out.

Had Black Leaf not been able to take a run up, the total distance jumped would have been halved from six and a half feet down to just over three feet—not high enough to get out.

Language (Choose Language)

Each skill point spent on the Language skill means that the character knows another language to an acceptable level that they can converse. However, even though the character speaks the language, their speech will be accented and they will be clearly noticeable as a foreigner.

If a character spends a second skill point on the same language, their skill increases to the point where they speak it like a native and no longer have a noticeable foreign accent.

The Game Master will determine which languages exist in their game world.

Laws (Choose Culture)

The Law skill is not a single skill. It is a group of related skills used in legal situations in a variety of cultures.

Each point spent in the law skill for a particular culture gives a +1 bonus to Intelligence Checks used to recall/interpret the laws and customs of that country.

Modifiers to the effective charisma used for these checks should come from particularly common or particularly obscure customs within that culture. For example knowing that a country has the death penalty for banditry is much easier than knowing that the country requires anyone setting up a market stall to buy a trading license from the alderman of the town.

Lip Reading

Each point spent on the Lip Reading skill gives a +1 bonus to Wisdom Checks made to understand what someone is saying even when you can’t hear them by watching the movement of their mouth.

Modifiers to the effective wisdom used for this skill should be used based on how clearly the person’s mouth can be seen, whether they are deliberately enunciating clearly in order to make it easy for you to lip read, and whether you are a native speaker of the language they are speaking (i.e. it’s a starting language or you spent two skill points on it) or whether you are merely fluent in it (i.e. you spent one skill point on it).

Magical Engineering

Each point spent on the Magical Engineering skill gives a +1 bonus to Intelligence Checks made to design large scale magical effects or identify the function of existing effects such as wormholes, gates, and some large scale magical traps.

Modifiers to these the effective intelligence used for checks to identify such magic should come from the obscurity of the effect being examined. Something that uses a standard spell effect should be easier than something that uses a unique effect.

When designing such effects, this skill is used for the design itself, but the building of large-scale magical constructions will involve spell casting and crafting skills.

Note: Although this skill can be used to identify how a large magical trap works, it should not be used as a replacement for either the Find Traps or Remove Traps abilities. At best, knowing how the trap functions may give insight into how the trap may be bypassed by mundane means.

Nature Lore

Each point spent on the Nature Lore skill gives a +1 bonus to Intelligence Checks made to recognise plants, natural terrain features, and natural creatures.

Most natural creatures or terrain features will give no bonus or penalty to the effective intelligence used for the roll, but a particularly common plant or animal might give a bonus and a particularly rare one might give a penalty.

Navigating

Each point spent in the Navigating skill gives a +1 bonus on Wisdom Rolls used to avoid getting lost by using landmarks and the position of the sun and stars.

The effective wisdom used for navigating checks may be modified by factors such as weather conditions, visibility, access (or lack of it) to equipment such as maps and/or sextants, and familiarity with the area being travelled.

Performance (Chose Medium)

The Performance skill is not a single skill. It is a group of related skills used when putting on different types of artistic performance. When spending a skill point on this skill, you must specify what sort of artistic performance your character is skilled at. An exhaustive list of possible artistic media is not possible, but examples include:

  • Singing

  • Playing a musical instrument

  • Dancing

  • Acting

  • Juggling

  • Jesting

  • Storytelling

  • Poetry

Each skill point spent on a specific craft skill gives a +1 bonus to both Dexterity Checks and Charisma Checks used to make these artistic performances.

Modifiers to the effective dexterity or charisma used in performance rolls can come from such things as particularly high or low quality costume and how much rehearsal time the performance has had.

Success in a performance may not be an all-or-nothing affair—a failed performance check is likely to still result in a performance of some kind. However, the quality of the finished work should be subjectively determined by the amount that the performance check succeeded by or failed by.

Religious Lore

Each point spent on the Religious Lore skill gives a +1 bonus to Intelligence Checks made to recall knowledge about religions, their targets of worship, and the creatures associated with them.

The effective intelligence score used for the religious lore check should be modified by the obscurity of the knowledge being sought.

Identifying a statue of a well known god should be much easier than identifying the purpose of a particular religious rite from a foreign religion.

Note: Characters should be assumed to know all about the rites and details their own religion without needing to make religious lore checks.

Riding (Choose Animal)

The Riding skill is not a single skill. It is a group of related skills used when making rolls to control or stay on various riding animals in unusual circumstances. When spending a skill point on this skill, you must specify what sort of animal your character is skilled at riding. An exhaustive list of animals is not possible, but examples include:

  • Horse (includes mules and donkeys)

  • Camel

  • Elephant

  • Dire Wolf

  • Griffon

  • Pegasus

  • Hippogriff

  • Giant Eagle

Each skill point spent on a specific riding skill gives a +1 bonus to Dexterity Checks used to ride that type of animal.

Generally, simply riding a calm animal as it walks shouldn’t require a riding check. However, staying on an animal when it bolts or stumbles, or when it is damaged by an attack, should require a check—with the effective dexterity modified by the exact circumstances provoking the check.

Sense Motive

Each point spent on the Sense Motive skill gives a +1 bonus to Wisdom Checks made to read the expressions and body language of NPCs in order to tell if they have an ulterior motive for their speech or behaviour. The skill is most often used to detect when an NPC is lying, although it can also in other situations, for example to try to tell if an NPC who is ignoring a character who is hiding is deliberately ignoring that character while trying to keep an eye on them or whether they simply haven’t seen them.

Note: See Social Skills for a warning about how some uses of this skill may disrupt the game.

Swimming

Each point spent on the Swimming skill gives a +1 bonus to Strength Checks made to swim while weighed down or in fast flowing or turbulent waters. Characters are assumed to be able to swim in calm water (providing they are not weighed down) without needing to make a swimming check, but heavily encumbered characters or characters trying to swim in difficult conditions will need to make such checks.

The effective strength used for swimming checks should be given modifiers based on the specific conditions that the character is trying to swim in, such as those listed above.

Tracking

Each point spent on the Tracking skill gives a +1 bonus to Wisdom Checks made to follow the tracks left by one of more creatures. Following (at a slow walk) a single human sized creature who walked through light woodland or farmland less than a day ago would require a roll with no modifiers.

The effective wisdom used for the tracking check should be modified by many factors such as:

  • Number of creatures being tracked

  • Size of creatures being tracked

  • Method of locomotion of creatures being tracked

  • Age of the tracks

  • Terrain being tracked through

  • Weather conditions

  • Tracking faster than a slow walk

Chapter 6: Weapon Feats

A character’s ability to use a particular type of weapon in combat is represented by Weapon Feats.

Table 6-1: Master Weapon Table
Useable by
Weapon Cleric Druid Dwarf Elf Fighter Halfling Magic-User Mystic Thief Damage; (at basic proficiency) Cost
One Handed Melee Weapons
Axe, Hand Y Y Y Y Y Y 1d6 4gp
Blackjack Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y 1d2 5gp
Club Y Y Y Y Y Y Y 1d4 3gp
Cestus Y Y Y Y Y Y 1d3 5gp
Dagger Y Y Y Y Y Y Y 1d4 3gp
Hammer, Throwing Y Y Y Y Y Y 1d4 4gp
Hammer, War Y Y Y Y Y Y 1d6 5gp
Javelin Y Y Y Y Y 1d6 1gp
Lance Y Y Y Y 1d10 10gp
Mace Y Y Y Y Y Y 1d6 5gp
Net Y Y Y Y Y Y 4gp
Spear Y Y Y Y 1d6 3gp
Sword, Bastard Y Y Y Y 1d6+1 15gp
Sword, Normal Y Y Y Y Y 1d8 10gp
Sword, Short Y Y Y Y Y Y 1d6 7gp
Trident Y Y Y Y Y 1d6 5gp
Unarmed Strike Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y 1
Whip Y Y Y Y Y Y 1d2 10gp
Two Handed Melee Weapons
Axe, Battle Y Y Y Y 1d8 7gp
Halberd Y Y Y 1d10 7gp
Pike Y Y Y 1d10 3gp
Poleaxe Y Y Y 1d10 5gp
Staff Y Y Y Y Y Y Y 1d6 5gp
Sword, Bastard Y Y Y 1d8+1 15gp
Sword, Two-Handed Y Y Y 1d10 15gp
Shield Weapons
Shield, Horned Y Y Y Y 1d2 15gp
Shield, Knife Y Y Y Y 1d4+1 65gp
Shield, Sword Y Y Y 1d4+2 200gp
Shield, Tusked Y Y 1d4+1 200gp
Missile Weapons
Blowgun, Large Y Y Y Y Y Y 3gp
Blowgun, Small Y Y Y Y Y Y 6gp
Bolas Y Y Y Y Y 1d2 5gp
Bow, Long Y Y Y Y 1d6 40gp
Bow, Short Y Y Y Y Y Y 1d6 25gp
Crossbow, Heavy Y Y Y Y 2d4 50gp
Crossbow, Light Y Y Y Y Y Y 1d6 30gp
Pistol Y Y Y Y Y Y Y 1d6 250gp
Sling Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y 1d4 2gp
Smoothbore Y Y Y 2d4 150gp

 

Starting Weapon Feats

At first level, characters start with either two or four weapon feats, which must be immediately spent on Basic weapon proficiency with two or four weapons useable by the character respectively.

A character may not spend more than one first level weapon feat on the same weapon.

Gaining Weapon Feats

As characters increase in level, they gain more weapon feats. See Chapter 4: Creating a Character for further details. These additional weapon feats cannot be spent immediately, but must be spent while weapon training. See Chapter 11: Gaining Experience for more information on weapon training. By training, the character can spend these additional weapon feats to either gain basic proficiency with new weapons or increase their proficiency level with existing weapons. Spending a single weapon feat will give the character a single increase in proficiency level with a weapon (to a maximum of Grandmaster Proficiency) regardless of how proficient the character currently is with that weapon or how many other weapons the character is proficient with.

There are 6 levels of proficiency with each weapon, listed below along with the abbreviations used for them in the tables in this chapter:

  • Non-Proficient (‘N’)

  • Basic Proficiency (‘B’)

  • Skilled Proficiency (‘S’)

  • Expert Proficiency (‘E’)

  • Master Proficiency (‘M’)

  • Grandmaster Proficiency (‘G’)

Characters start out non-proficient with all weapons other than those they spent their starting weapon feats to gain proficiency with.

Effects of Proficiency

As a character gains more proficiency levels with a weapon, they will usually do more damage with it. The damage done by a weapon is listed for each proficiency level in the detailed weapon descriptions in this chapter.

Increasing in proficiency level with a weapon will usually also result in an increased attack bonus with that weapon and an armour class bonus against one or more opponents when using that weapon.

Some types of weapon have special abilities such as the ability to deflect attacks or the ability to ensnare opponents, which can be used only by characters with a high enough level of proficiency.

Opponent Types

Although some weapons are equally effective against any opponent, weapons intended for warfare are often more effective against other opponents armed with melee weapons; whereas weapons intended for hunting are often more effective against unarmed opponents. In the weapon descriptions in this chapter, each weapon has its effectiveness indicated against each type of opponent separately.

Note that opponents wielding missile weapons use the same values as opponents who are completely unarmed or using natural attacks such as claws.

Ammunition & Loading

All missile weapons require ammunition, for example bows need arrows and guns need bullets. In addition, guns also require a charge of red powder to work.

Any character can load a weapon with ammunition, even those who are not proficient in its use. Loading a weapon does not take an action, and is assumed to be part of the normal Attack action (see Chapter 10: Combat for a full description of actions).

If a character gets multiple attacks for any reason, they can reload between each attack. For example, a 28th level fighter is able to make three attacks against opponents that they can hit on a 2+ (after modifiers). That fighter could make all three attacks with a bow, crossbow, sling or gun and reload between each attack all in a single Attack action.

The only exception to this rule is with pistols. Although pistols require only one hand to fire, they require two hands to reload. Therefore unless a character has a free hand, they can only fire a single shot from a pistol in one Attack action even if they would normally get more than one attack.

Similarly, if a character has no free hand, they cannot make a second attack with a pistol in subsequent rounds until such time as they have a free hand in order to reload.

A character equipped with multiple pistols but no free hand can take advantage of having multiple attacks if they are prepared to drop each empty pistol after firing it and draw a new loaded one.

Alphabetical Weapon List

The following pages list each weapon along with most of its abilities. Some weapon abilities which are either extremely common or are complex enough to need a longer description are not listed with specific weapons.

All weapon abilities are listed after the weapon descriptions.

Axe, Battle

A battle axe is a two handed axe 2’-4’ in length, usually with a double blade or a spike on the reverse of the blade.

Delay: When the wielder of a weapon with the delay ability hits an opponent with it, the opponent must make a saving throw vs Paralysis or automatically lose initiative in the following round.

Stun: A weapon with the stun ability will stun any opponent it hits that is approximately the same size as the wielder of the weapon (or smaller) unless they make a saving throw vs Death Ray.

A stunned opponent cannot attack or cast spells and can only move at 1/3 normal speed. Stunned opponents also have a +2 penalty to armour class and a –2 penalty to all saving throws. A stunned character can make a saving throw vs Death Ray each round to shake off the stun.

Axe, Hand

A hand axe is a one handed axe 1’-2’ in length, usually with a single blade. A hand axe is often thrown while its owner rushes towards melee range.

Blackjack

A blackjack, also known as a cosh, is a small leather club usually filled with sand. Blackjacks are too soft to do significant damage, but are very useful for temporarily knocking people unconscious without doing permanent damage.

Knockout: Any target that the weapon hits may become delayed, stunned or knocked out depending on their hit dice or level compared to the proficiency level of the weapon wielder. See table 6-73 for details. The target must make a saving throw vs Death Ray with a penalty based on the proficiency of the wielder when hit in order to avoid the effect. If this fails, the target is affected as normal by the delay, stun or knock out.

An enemy who is knocked out will be unconscious for 1d100 rounds before waking up.

Blowgun, Small

Small blowguns are tubes 1’-2’ in length through which tiny darts are blown. Blowgun darts are too small to cause more than a scratch, but are an effective means by which poison can be delivered. Small blowguns can be used in one hand.

Poison Save: If the weapon with this ability is poisoned, the target takes the listed penalty on their saving throws against the poison.

Blowgun, Large

Large blowguns are tubes 2’-4’ in length through which tiny darts are blown. Blowgun darts are too small to cause more than a scratch, but are an effective means by which poison can be delivered. Large blowguns require two hands to fire them.

Poison Save: If the weapon with this ability is poisoned, the target takes the listed penalty on their saving throws against the poison.

Bolas

A bolas is a set of weights (usually three) on the ends of connected ropes 3’-4’ in length. The bolas is whirled around and then thrown at the opponent in order to entangle or even strangle them.

Strangle: If the wielder of the weapon rolls the number indicated or higher on the dice, before modifiers, and the attack hits the target after modifiers, then the target of the attack must make an immediate saving throw vs Death Ray with the listed penalty or be paralysed and die after 1d6+2 rounds of strangulation. Should the target be freed from strangulation, they will remain paralysed for 2d6 rounds.

If the wielder of the weapon does not roll the required numbers but still hits the target, the target is affected as though the weapon were an entangling weapon with the same saving throw penalty.

Bow, Long

A long bow is a 4’-6’ bow, either made from a single piece of wood or a composite of different woods. A long bow requires both hands to fire.

Delay: When the wielder of a weapon with the delay ability hits an opponent with it, the opponent must make a saving throw vs Paralysis or automatically lose initiative in the following round.

Some ranged weapons can only delay opponents at listed ranges.

Bow, Short

A short bow is a 3’-4’ bow, either made from a single piece of wood or a composite of different woods. A short bow requires both hands to fire.

Delay: When the wielder of a weapon with the delay ability hits an opponent with it, the opponent must make a saving throw vs Paralysis or automatically lose initiative in the following round.

Some ranged weapons can only delay opponents at listed ranges.

Cestus

A cestus is a spiked or bladed metal band that may either be worn around the hand or built into a gauntlet. Although only a small weapon, it can be used without incurring off-hand penalties.

Off-Hand: A weapon with this ability does not suffer the normal to-hit and proficiency penalties when used in the wielder’s off hand.

Club

A club is a crude blunt weapon—little more than a roughly shaped piece of wood—that can be used in one hand.

Crossbow, Heavy

A heavy crossbow is a large two-handed missile weapon. It has powerful metal arms and a string that is pulled back using a crank.

Stun: A weapon with the stun ability will stun any opponent it hits that is approximately the same size as the wielder of the weapon (or smaller) unless they make a saving throw vs Death Ray.

Some ranged weapons can only stun opponents at listed ranges.

A stunned opponent cannot attack or cast spells and can only move at 1/3 normal speed. Stunned opponents also have a +2 penalty to armour class and a –2 penalty to all saving throws. A stunned character can make a saving throw vs Death Ray each round to shake off the stun.

Crossbow, Light

A light crossbow is a medium sized missile weapon, although it still needs two hands to wield. It has powerful metal arms and a string that is pulled back using a lever.

Stun: A weapon with the stun ability will stun any opponent it hits that is approximately the same size as the wielder of the weapon (or smaller) unless they make a saving throw vs Death Ray.

Some ranged weapons can only stun opponents at listed ranges.

A stunned opponent cannot attack or cast spells and can only move at 1/3 normal speed. Stunned opponents also have a +2 penalty to armour class and a –2 penalty to all saving throws. A stunned character can make a saving throw vs Death Ray each round to shake off the stun.

Dagger

A dagger is a short light blade which is 18” long or less. Daggers are popular weapons because their small size makes them easy to conceal and they can be either thrown or used in melee.

Double Damage: If the wielder of the weapon rolls the number indicated or higher on the dice, before modifiers, and the attack hits the target after modifiers, then the attack does double the normal amount of damage.

Halberd

A halberd is a large pole-arm 6’ to 8’ in length, the head of which has a long spike with an axe blade on one side and a hook on the reverse side.

Disarm: The wielder of a weapon with the disarm ability can choose to try to disarm their opponent instead of doing damage. The character’s player must announce that a disarm attempt is being made before rolling any dice for the attack. If the attack hits then the target must make a Dexterity Check (see Chapter 5: Ability Checks & Skills) with the listed penalty to their effective dexterity or drop their weapon.

Hook: The wielder of a weapon with the hook ability can choose to try to hook their opponent and trip them instead of attacking for damage. The character’s player must announce that a hook attempt is being made before rolling any dice for the attack. If the attack hits, the weapon causes only minimum damage and the target must make a saving throw vs Paralysis or fall prone.

Hammer, Throwing

A throwing hammer is a one handed hammer from 18” to 2’ in length that is weighted for throwing. Despite the name, it can also be used in melee.

Stun: A weapon with the stun ability will stun any opponent it hits that is approximately the same size as the wielder of the weapon (or smaller) unless they make a saving throw vs Death Ray.

Some ranged weapons can only stun opponents at listed ranges.

A stunned opponent cannot attack or cast spells and can only move at 1/3 normal speed. Stunned opponents also have a +2 penalty to armour class and a –2 penalty to all saving throws. A stunned character can make a saving throw vs Death Ray each round to shake off the stun.

Hammer, War

A war hammer is a large one handed hammer, usually 2’ to 3’ in length. The head of a war hammer is often symmetrical to aid in balance.

Javelin

A javelin is a light one-handed throwing spear. Although primarily used as a thrown weapon, it can also be used in melee.

Lance

A lance is an extremely long spear, 9’ to 12’ long. It is too unwieldy to use on foot, and can only be used when mounted—in which case it can be used in one hand despite its length.

Charge: When a weapon with the charge ability is used after the wielder’s mount has charged 20’ or more in the round, the weapon does double the normal amount of damage.

Mace

A mace is a one handed melee weapon consisting of a 2’-3’ long shaft with a heavy metal head. The head can be smooth (round or pear shaped), can contain flanges or studs, or can even be sculpted into the shape of a fist or skull or other roundish object.

Net

Nets designed for use in combat are generally 6’ to 9’ in diameter, and usually have small weights around their edge to hold them open when they are flung. This arrangement lets them be thrown one-handed if held in their centre. Nets do no damage to opponents in combat, but are excellent defensive weapons.

Entangle: Any target that the weapon hits may become delayed, slowed or entangled depending on their hit dice or level compared to the proficiency level of the weapon wielder.

See table 6-72 for details. The target must make a saving throw vs Death Ray with a penalty based on the proficiency of the wielder when first hit in order to avoid the effect. If this fails, the target is affected but may repeat the saving throw each round until they make it, at which point they are no longer affected.

An entangled target cannot attack, cast spells, or move.

Pike

A pike is an extremely long spear, 7’ to 15’ long. It can only be wielded using two hands.

Set: The wielder of this weapon may brace it against a charging foe. The wielder automatically gains initiative over the charging foe, and if they hit then they do double normal damage.

Pistol

A pistol is a short gun, 9” to 12” long. It can be fired using only one hand, but needs both hands to reload.

Pistols require both red powder and bullets to load. See Chapter 8: Equipping for Adventure for more details about red powder.

Delay: When the wielder of a weapon with the delay ability hits an opponent with it, the opponent must make a saving throw vs Paralysis or automatically lose initiative in the following round.

Some ranged weapons can only delay opponents at listed ranges.

Poleaxe

A poleaxe consists of an axe blade (usually single sided, but occasionally double sided) with a 6’ to 8’ long shaft. It is wielded in both hands like a large two-handed axe.

Shield, Horned

A horned shield is a small (1’) buckler (strap-on shield) with a horn, spike or blade protruding from the centre at right angles to the shield. It is primarily used for attacking, and does not provide a normal shield bonus; only an AC bonus based on proficiency level.

Off-Hand: A weapon with this ability does not suffer the normal to-hit and proficiency penalties when used in the wielder’s off hand.

Shield, Knife

A knife shield is a small (1’) buckler (strap-on shield) with a knife blades protruding from either side, at right angles to the arm. It is primarily used for attacking, and does not provide a normal shield bonus; only an AC bonus based on proficiency level.

Off-Hand: A weapon with this ability does not suffer the normal to-hit and proficiency penalties when used in the wielder’s off hand.

Breakable: A breakable shield weapon is more fragile than a normal weapon and has a chance of breaking when used. Whenever the character using it rolls the exact number needed to hit an enemy or an enemy rolls the exact number needed to hit the character, there is a chance that the shield weapon will break.

The Game Master should roll a d10, add the magical bonus of the shield weapon itself and subtract the magical bonus of the weapon (if any) that struck it. If the modified total is 5 or less, then the shield weapon has broken. When broken, it will still provide its armour class bonus, but can no longer be used to make attacks.

Shield, Sword

A sword shield is a medium sized (1’) buckler (strap-on shield) with a sword or spear blade protruding from the end, parallel to the wielder’s arm so that it sticks out from behind their hand. It is primarily used for attacking, and does not provide a normal shield bonus; only an AC bonus based on proficiency level.

Off-Hand: A weapon with this ability does not suffer the normal to-hit and proficiency penalties when used in the wielder’s off hand.

Breakable: A breakable shield weapon is more fragile than a normal weapon and has a chance of breaking when used. Whenever the character using it rolls the exact number needed to hit an enemy or an enemy rolls the exact number needed to hit the character, there is a chance that the shield weapon will break.

The Game Master should roll a d10, add the magical bonus of the shield weapon itself and subtract the magical bonus of the weapon (if any) that struck it. If the modified total is 5 or less, then the shield weapon has broken. When broken, it will still provide its armour class bonus, but can no longer be used to make attacks.

Shield, Tusked

A tusked shield is a large hold-out shield, with spikes all around the edge and a spike protruding from the centre. This heavy shield must be used in two hands, and it does not provide a normal shield bonus; only an AC bonus based on proficiency level.

Two Attacks: Weapons with this ability can be used to attack twice each round, as if the attacks were made by a primary hand and off hand weapon, but without the normal off hand penalties to their to-hit rolls and proficiency level.

Breakable: A breakable shield weapon is more fragile than a normal weapon and has a chance of breaking when used. Whenever the character using it rolls the exact number needed to hit an enemy or an enemy rolls the exact number needed to hit the character, there is a chance that the shield weapon will break.

The Game Master should roll a d10, add the magical bonus of the shield weapon itself and subtract the magical bonus of the weapon (if any) that struck it. If the modified total is 5 or less, then the shield weapon has broken. When broken, it will still provide its armour class bonus, but can no longer be used to make attacks.

Sling

A sling is a long (4’ to 6’) leather cord with a pouch half way along. The wielder straps one end of the cord around their wrist and holds the other end in the same hand. They then place a stone in the pouch and swing the cord over their head. At the mid-point of the swing, they let go of the loose end, which releases the stone.

Stun: A weapon with the stun ability will stun any opponent it hits that is approximately the same size as the wielder of the weapon (or smaller) unless they make a saving throw vs Death Ray.

Some ranged weapons can only stun opponents at listed ranges.

A stunned opponent cannot attack or cast spells and can only move at 1/3 normal speed. Stunned opponents also have a +2 penalty to armour class and a –2 penalty to all saving throws. A stunned character can make a saving throw vs Death Ray each round to shake off the stun.

Smoothbore

A smoothbore is a long gun, 3’ to 5’ long. It requires two hands to both fire and reload.

Smoothbores require both red powder and bullets to load. See Chapter 8: Equipping for Adventure for more details about red powder.

Stun: A weapon with the stun ability will stun any opponent it hits that is approximately the same size as the wielder of the weapon (or smaller) unless they make a saving throw vs Death Ray.

Some ranged weapons can only stun opponents at listed ranges.

A stunned opponent cannot attack or cast spells and can only move at 1/3 normal speed. Stunned opponents also have a +2 penalty to armour class and a –2 penalty to all saving throws. A stunned character can make a saving throw vs Death Ray each round to shake off the stun.

Spear

A spear is a 5’ to 7’ long shaft with a stabbing blade on the end. Despite its length, a spear is a well balanced weapon and can either be used in melee one-handed or thrown.

Set: The wielder of this weapon may brace it against a charging foe. The wielder automatically gains initiative over the charging foe, and if they hit then they do double the normal damage.

Stun: A weapon with the stun ability will stun any opponent it hits that is approximately the same size as the wielder of the weapon (or smaller) unless they make a saving throw vs Death Ray.

Some ranged weapons can only stun opponents at listed ranges.

A stunned opponent cannot attack or cast spells and can only move at 1/3 normal speed. Stunned opponents also have a +2 penalty to armour class and a –2 penalty to all saving throws. A stunned character can make a saving throw vs Death Ray each round to shake off the stun.

Staff

A staff is one of the most simple weapons. It consists of just a length of wood 5’ to 7’ in length, which is wielded in two hands.

Deflect: If a number is listed for this ability, the wielder of the weapon can attempt to deflect a number of incoming attacks equal to this number by making a saving throw vs Death Ray against each of them. A successful saving throw means that the attack is deflected and the character takes no damage.

The character can decide which attacks to try to deflect, so they can save the attempts for use against a tougher opponent who is attacking later in the round rather than having to use them against a weak opponent who happens to be attacking first. However, the character must announce which attacks they wish to try to deflect against before attacks are rolled.

These deflection attempts must be used against attacks coming from opponents of the relevant type, regardless of what type of opponent the character is attacking. For example, a character who is skilled with a normal sword gets a deflection attempt against one attack from an armed opponent per round, even if the character is actually attacking an unarmed opponent.

When a character uses two weapons in combat, the deflection attempts given by each weapon do not stack. The character gets to use a number of attempts equal to the higher number granted by either of the weapons.

Sword, Bastard (One Handed)

A bastard sword, also known as a longsword, is a sword with a long (3’ to 4’) narrow blade that is used either one-handed or two-handed. The same weapon proficiency covers both forms of usage.

Sword, Bastard (Two Handed)

A bastard sword, also known as a longsword, is a sword with a long (3’ to 4’) narrow blade that is used either one-handed or two-handed. The same weapon proficiency covers both forms of usage.

Sword, Normal

A normal sword is a one-handed sword with a straight or curved blade 2’ to 3’ long. This category of sword encompasses a variety of different styles of sword, ranging from scimitars to broadswords and even rapiers.

Disarm: The wielder of a weapon with the disarm ability can choose to try to disarm their opponent instead of attacking for damage. The character’s player must announce that a disarm attempt is being made before rolling any dice for the attack. If the attack hits then the target of the attack must make a Dexterity Check (see Chapter 5: Ability Checks & Skills) with the listed penalty to their effective dexterity or drop their weapon.

Sword, Short

A short sword is a sword with a straight 18” to 2’ blade. Primarily used as a stabbing rather than slashing weapon, this small blade can be used in one hand.

Disarm: The wielder of a weapon with the disarm ability can choose to try to disarm their opponent instead of attacking for damage. The character’s player must announce that a disarm attempt is being made before rolling any dice for the attack. If the attack hits then the target of the attack must make a Dexterity Check (see Chapter 5: Ability Checks & Skills) with the listed penalty to their effective dexterity or drop their weapon.

Sword, Two-Handed

A two-handed sword, sometimes known as a greatsword, is a large and heavy sword with a 4’ to 5’ blade. It is always used in two hands.

Stun: A weapon with the stun ability will stun any opponent it hits that is approximately the same size as the wielder of the weapon (or smaller) unless they make a saving throw vs Death Ray.

Some ranged weapons can only stun opponents at listed ranges.

A stunned opponent cannot attack or cast spells and can only move at 1/3 normal speed. Stunned opponents also have a +2 penalty to armour class and a –2 penalty to all saving throws. A stunned character can make a saving throw vs Death Ray each round to shake off the stun.

Trident

A trident is a short (4’ to 6’) spear which is split at the end into three tines, like a fork. Each tine is usually barbed. A trident is used in one hand either in melee or as a thrown weapon, and is often used as a fishing spear, since the barbs on the points can lift the fish out of the water when the trident is withdrawn.

Skewer: If the weapon hits an opponent with the listed number of hit dice (or levels) or less, the opponent may be skewered if the attacker so chooses.

The attacker must let go of the weapon, and it remains caught in the opponent for 1d4+4 rounds, doing 1d6 damage each round. If the opponent spends a round removing the weapon, they take double damage that round but are then free of the weapon.

Unarmed Strikes

Unarmed strikes include boxing, street fighting and other martial arts. Unarmed attacks are considered to be one-handed attacks for purposes of mixing them with other attacks, although they may actually include strikes using other parts of the body.

Any character can learn unarmed fighting, although mystic characters know special combat techniques and may choose strike to kill rather than striking to stun. If they strike to kill, they do increased damage listed on table 4-8 instead of the damage listed here. A mystic striking to kill does not roll for knockout chances, and gets the number of attacks listed on table 4-8 rather than making off-hand attacks. The mystic must decide which form of attack they are using before rolling for initiative.

Example: Brother Karne is a 10th level mystic with Master level proficiency with unarmed strikes, and is fighting an ogre who is armed with a large club.

Each round he has a choice between striking twice to stun (using an off-hand attack with no penalty) with a chance to knock the ogre out, and he will do 2d4 damage; or striking three times to kill, in which case he will do 2d10 damage but have no chance to knock the ogre out. In either case, he will get a +6 bonus to hit the ogre since the ogre is armed.

Knockout: Any target that the unarmed strike hits may become delayed, stunned or knocked out depending on their hit dice or level compared to the proficiency level of the striker. See table 6-73 for details. The target must make a saving throw vs Death Ray with a penalty based on the proficiency of the striker when hit in order to avoid the effect. If this fails, the target is affected as normal by the delay, stun or knock out.

An enemy who is knocked out will be unconscious for 1d100 rounds before waking up.

Whip

A whip is a woven leather cord from 5’ to 15’ in length that is used in one hand. Whips do little damage, and are more often used for corporal punishment than for serious combat.

Entangle: Any target that the weapon hits may become delayed, slowed or entangled depending on their hit dice or level compared to the proficiency level of the weapon wielder. See table 6-67 for details. The target must make a saving throw vs Death Ray with a penalty based on the proficiency of the wielder when first hit in order to avoid the effect. If this fails, the target is affected but may repeat the saving throw each round until they make it, at which point they are no longer affected.

An entangled target cannot attack, cast spells, or move.

Weapon Abilities

The various weapon abilities listed on the previous tables are described below.

AC Bonus: When using the weapon, a character gains the listed armour class bonus against the given number of incoming attacks each round. For example, an entry of “-2 vs 3” means that the wielder of the weapon gains a –2 bonus to their armour class against three incoming attacks. The character can decide which attacks to use the bonus against so they can save the bonus for use against a tougher opponent who is attacking later in the round rather than having to use them against a weak opponent who happens to be attacking first. However, the character must announce which attacks they wish to use the bonus against before attacks are rolled.

These armour class bonuses must be used against attacks coming from opponents of the relevant type, regardless of what type of opponent the character is attacking. For example, a character who is skilled with a normal sword gets a –2 AC bonus against one attack from an armed opponent per round, even if the character is actually attacking an unarmed opponent.

When a character uses two weapons in combat, they get whichever AC bonus is most beneficial against each incoming attack. The bonuses do not stack.

Example: Black Leaf is wielding a normal sword in her main hand and a club in her off hand. She has expert proficiency with each weapon, although because the club is in her off hand it counts as having only skilled proficiency.

The sword gives her –2 AC vs 2 attacks by armed opponents. The club gives her –1 AC vs 2 attacks by armed opponents and –1 AC vs 2 attacks by unarmed opponents.

The bonuses against armed opponents don’t stack, so each round Black Leaf has a total of –2 AC against two attacks by armed opponents and –1 AC against two attacks by unarmed opponents.

Breakable: A breakable shield weapon is more fragile than a normal weapon and has a chance of breaking when used.

Whenever the character using it rolls the exact number needed to hit an enemy or an enemy rolls the exact number needed to hit the character, there is a chance that the shield weapon will break.

The Game Master should roll a d10, add the magical bonus of the shield weapon itself and subtract the magical bonus of the weapon (if any) that struck it. If the modified total is 5 or less, then the shield weapon has broken. When broken, it will still provide its armour class bonus, but can no longer be used to make attacks.

Charge: When a weapon with the charge ability is used after the wielder’s mount has charged 20’ or more in the round, the weapon does double the normal amount of damage.

Deflect: If a number is listed for this ability, the wielder of the weapon can attempt to deflect a number of incoming attacks equal to this number by making a saving throw vs Death Ray against each of them. A successful saving throw means that the attack is deflected and the character takes no damage.

The character can decide which attacks to try to deflect, so they can save the attempts for use against a tougher opponent who is attacking later in the round rather than having to use them against a weak opponent who happens to be attacking first. However, the character must announce which attacks they wish to try to deflect against before attacks are rolled.

These deflection attempts must be used against attacks coming from opponents of the relevant type, regardless of what type of opponent the character is attacking. For example, a character who is skilled with a normal sword gets a deflection attempt against one attack from an armed opponent per round, even if the character is actually attacking an unarmed opponent.

When a character uses two weapons in combat, the deflection attempts given by each weapon do not stack. The character gets to use a number of attempts equal to the higher number granted by either of the weapons.

Delay: When the wielder of a weapon with the delay ability hits an opponent with it, the opponent must make a saving throw vs Paralysis or automatically lose initiative in the following round.

Some ranged weapons can only delay opponents at listed ranges.

Disarm: The wielder of a weapon with the disarm ability can choose to try to disarm their opponent instead of attacking for damage. The character’s player must announce that a disarm attempt is being made before rolling any dice for the attack. If the attack hits then the target of the attack must make a Dexterity Check (see Chapter 5: Ability Checks & Skills) with the listed penalty to their effective dexterity or drop their weapon.

Double Damage: If the wielder of the weapon rolls the number indicated or higher on the dice, before modifiers, and the attack hits the target after modifiers, then the attack does double the normal amount of damage.

Entangle: Any target that the weapon hits may become delayed, slowed or entangled depending on their hit dice or level compared to the proficiency level of the weapon wielder. See table 6-72 for details. The target must make a saving throw vs Death Ray with a penalty based on the proficiency of the wielder when first hit in order to avoid the effect. If this fails, the target is affected but may repeat the saving throw each round until they make it, at which point they are no longer affected.

An entangled target cannot attack, cast spells, or move.

Hook: The wielder of a weapon with the hook ability can choose to try to hook their opponent and trip them instead of attacking for damage. The character’s player must announce that a hook attempt is being made before rolling any dice for the attack. If the attack hits, the weapon causes only minimum damage and the target must make a saving throw vs Paralysis or fall prone.

Hurl Range: A weapon with a hurl range is one that is not normally thrown, but with great skill and effort can be hurled at an opponent at the short/medium/long ranges shown. Such hurling of weapons uses the character’s strength modifier rather than their dexterity modifier. Because such weapons are not aerodynamic and do not fly well, opponents who are not surprised by the attack may make a saving throw vs Death Ray in order to take half damage.

However, the first time in each fight that an opponent has the weapon thrown at them, they must roll for surprise at normal chances due to the unexpected nature of the attack.

Knockout: Any target that the weapon hits may become delayed, stunned or knocked out depending on their hit dice or level compared to the proficiency level of the weapon wielder. See table 6-73 for details. The target must make a saving throw vs Death Ray with a penalty based on the proficiency of the wielder when hit in order to avoid the effect. If this fails, the target is affected as normal by the delay, stun or knock out.

An enemy who is knocked out will be unconscious for 1d100 rounds before waking up.

Missile Range: The three numbers given are the short/medium/long ranges of the missiles that the weapon shoots.

Off-Hand: A weapon with this ability does not suffer the normal to-hit and proficiency penalties when used in the wielder’s off hand.

Poison Save: If the weapon with this ability is poisoned, the target takes the listed penalty on their saving throws against the poison.

Set: The wielder of this weapon may brace it against a charging foe. The wielder automatically gains initiative over the charging foe, and if they hit then they do double normal damage.

Skewer: If the weapon hits an opponent with the listed number of hit dice (or levels) or less, the opponent may be skewered if the attacker so chooses.

The attacker must let go of the weapon, and it remains caught in the opponent for 1d4+4 rounds, doing 1d6 damage each round. If the opponent spends a round removing the weapon, they take double damage that round but are then free of the weapon.

Strangle: If the wielder of the weapon rolls the number indicated or higher on the dice, before modifiers, and the attack hits the target after modifiers, then the target of the attack must make an immediate saving throw vs Death Ray with the listed penalty or be paralysed and die after 1d6+2 rounds of strangulation. Should the target be freed from strangulation, they will remain paralysed for 2d6 rounds.

If the wielder of the weapon does not roll the required numbers but still hits the target, the target is affected as though the weapon were an entangling weapon with the same saving throw penalty.

Stun: A weapon with the stun ability will stun any opponent it hits that is approximately the same size as the wielder of the weapon (or smaller) unless they make a saving throw vs Death Ray.

Some ranged weapons can only stun opponents at listed ranges.

A stunned opponent cannot attack or cast spells and can only move at 1/3 normal speed. Stunned opponents also have a +2 penalty to armour class and a –2 penalty to all saving throws. A stunned character can make a saving throw vs Death Ray each round to shake off the stun.

Throw Range: The three numbers given are the short/medium/long ranges of the missiles that the weapon can be thrown.

Two Attacks: Weapons with this ability can be used to attack twice each round, as if the attacks were made by a primary hand and off hand weapon, but without the normal off hand penalties to their to-hit rolls and proficiency level.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s